The Cambridge Handbook of the Social Sciences in Australia

By Ian McAllister; Steve Dowrick et al. | Go to book overview
2
Monetary targeting was practised in Australia from 1976 to 1985. Argy, Brennan and Stevens (2000) detail performance in terms of monetary targets and outcomes in Australia and other countries.
3
An account of this debate from the point of view of the RBA is provided in Macfarlane (1999). See also Hartley and Porter (1989), Sieper and Wells (1991) and Hanke, Porter and Schuler (1992).
5
For a striking graphical representation of the variety of estimates of the 'natural rate' of unemployment, see Borland and Kennedy (1998: 71). Lye, McDonald and Sibley (2001) have used a different approach to most of the literature in that they derive a range of values over which demand management can influence unemployment. Clearly it is the minimum of this range that is policy-relevant, so some of our comments on 'single-number' estimate also apply to uses that might be made of this research.

References

Ablett, J. 1996. Intergenerational accounting and saving in Australia. Economic Record 72(218):236–45.

Albon, R. 1995. Ensuring responsibility in Australian budgets. Agenda 2(1):17–26.

Argy, V., A. Brennan and G. Stevens. 1990. Monetary targeting:The international experience. Economic Record 66(192):37–62.

Benge, M., and G. Wells. 2002. Growth and the current account in a small open economy. Journal of Economic Education 33(2):152–65.

Blundell-Wignall, A., and S. Thorp. 1987. Money Demand, Own Interest Rates and Deregulation. Research Discussion Paper 8703. Canberra: Reserve Bank of Australia.

Borland, J., and S. Kennedy. 1998. 'Dimensions, structure and history of unemployment' in Unemployment and the Australian Labour Market. Edited by G. Debelle and J. Borland, pp. 68–99. Canberra: Reserve Bank of Australia.

Brischetto, A., and G. Voss. 1999. A Structural Vector Autoregression Model of Monetary Policy in Australia. Research Discussion Paper 9911. Canberra: Reserve Bank of Australia.

Buiter, W. 1997. Generational accounts, aggregate saving and intergenerational distribution. Economica 64(256):605–26.

Caves, R.E., and L.B. Krause (eds). 1984. The Australian Economy: A View from the North. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.

Commonwealth Treasury. 2001. The net income deficit over the past two decades. Economic Roundup Centenary Edition.

Costello, Hon. P. (Commonwealth Treasurer). 2002. Intergenerational Report 2002–03. Canberra: Parliament House.

de Brouwer, G., I. Ng and R. Subbaraman. 1993. The Demand for Money in Australia: New Tests on an Old Topic. Research Discussion Paper 9314. Canberra. Reserve Bank of Australia.

de Brouwer, G., and J. O'Regan, 1997. Evaluating Simple Monetary-Policy Rules for Australia. RBA Annual Conference Volume 1997–16. Canberra: Reserve Bank of Australia.

Dennis, Richard. Forthcoming. Exploring the role of the real exchange rate in Australian monetary policy. Economic Record.

Dungey, M., and B. Hayward. 2000. Dating changes in monetary policy in Australia. Australian Economic Review 33(3):281–5.

Dungey, M., and A. Pagan. 2000. A structural VAR model of the Australian economy. Economic Record 76(235):321–42.

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