The Cambridge Handbook of the Social Sciences in Australia

By Ian McAllister; Steve Dowrick et al. | Go to book overview
used to encompass all works that hold that when states share common interests they can cooperate through the construction and maintenance of international institutions. Rationalism thus includes the soft rationalism associated with the English School and the economistic rationalism of US neoliberalism.
2
For surveys of Australian international relations prior to the mid-1980s, see Indyk (1985), Miller (1983), Kubalkova and Cruickshank (1987), and Higgott (1991).

References

Ashley, R. 1986. 'The poverty of neorealism' in Neorealism and Its Critics. Edited by R.O. Keohane, pp. 255–300. New York: Columbia University Press.

Bell, C. 1962. Negotiation from Strength. London: Chatto and Windus.

Bell, C. 1984. Dependent Ally:A Study in Australian Foreign Policy. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

Bleiker, R. 1999. Popular Dissent, Human Agency, and Global Politics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bull, H. 1969. 'International theory: The case for a classical approach' in Contending Approaches to International Relations. Edited by K. Knorr and J.N. Rosenau, pp. 20–38. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Bull, H. 1972. International relations as an academic pursuit. Australian Outlook 26.

Bull, H. 1997. The Anarchical Society:A Study of Order in World Politics. 2nd ed. London: Macmillan.

Burchill, S., D. Cox, and G. Smith. 1996. Australia in the World:An Introduction to Australian Foreign Policy. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

Burke, A. 2001. In Fear of Security:Australia's Invasion Anxiety. Sydney: Pluto Press.

Camilleri, J.A. 1973. An Introduction to Australian Foreign Policy. 1st ed. Milton: Jacaranda.

Camilleri, J.A. 1987. ANZUS:Australia's Predicament in the Nuclear Age. London: Macmillan.

Camilleri, J.A., and J. Falk. 1992. The End of Sovereignty? The Politics of a Shrinking and Fragmenting World. London: Edward Elgar.

Camilleri, J.A., A. Paolini and A. Jarvis (eds). 1995. The State in Transition: Reimagining Political Space. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner.

Campbell, D. 1988. 'Recent changes in social theory: Questions for international relations' in New Directions in International Relations? Australian Perspectives. Canberra Studies in World Affairs 23. Edited by R. Higgott, pp. 11–64. Canberra: Department of International Relations, Australian National University.

Campbell, D. 1990. Global inscription: How foreign policy constitutes the United States. Alternatives 15:263–86.

Campbell, D. 1992. Writing Security:United States Foreign Policy and the Politics of Identity. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Carr, E.H. 1946. The Twenty Years'Crisis,1919–1939: An Introduction to the Study of International Relations. 2nd ed. London: Macmillan.

Cheeseman, G. 1993. The Search for Self-Reliance: Australian Defence since Vietnam. Melbourne: Longman Cheshire.

Cochran, M. 1999. Normative Theory in International Relations: A Pragmatic Approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Cooper, A.F., R. Higgott and K.R. Nossal (eds). 1993. Relocating Middle Powers:Australia and Canada in a Changing World.Vancouver: UBC Press.

Cotton, J., and J. Ravenhill (eds). 1997. Seeking Asian Engagement:Australia in World Affairs,1991–95. Melbourne : Oxford University Press.

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