Japan's Comfort Women: Sexual Slavery and Prostitution during World War II and the U.S. Occupation

By Yuki Tanaka | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1
Maria Rosa Henson, Comfort Women: A Filipina's Story of Prostitution and Slavery Under the Japanese Military (Rowaman & Littlefield, Maryland, 1999) pp. 36-37.
2
Pak Kyeong sik, Chōsenjn Kyōsei Renkō no Kiroku (Mirai-sha, Tokyo, 1965).
3
Jonathan Glover, Humanity: A Moral History of the Twentieth Century ( Jonathan Cape, London, 1999) p. 404.
4
Primo Levi, The Drowned and the Saved (Michael Joseph, London, 1988) pp. 169-170, cited by Jonathan Glover, op. cit., p. 402.

Chapter 1:The origins of the comfort women system
1
Yoshimi Yoshiaki ed., Jūgun Ianfu Shiryō-shū (Ōtsuki Shoten, Tokyo, 1992) Document No. 34, pp. 183-185. Jūgun Ianfu Shiryō-shū (hereafter JIS) is a collection of extracts of relevant parts from 106 items of official documents related to the comfort women issue. They were found mainly at the Archives of the Defense Research Institute (hereafter ADRI) in Tokyo between the late 1980s and early 1990s.
2
Ibid., Document No. 34, p. 184.
3
Ibid., Document No. 34, p. 185.
4
Ibid., Document No. 4, pp. 100-101.
5
Inaba Masao ed., Okamura Yasuji Taishō Shiryō Vol. 1 (Hara Shobō, Tokyo, 1970) p. 302.
6
I will analyze the history of karayuki-san in more detail in the conclusion of this book in relation to the development of the comfort women system. For details of the history of karayuki-san, see, for example: Morisaki Kazue, Karayuki-san (Asahi Shinbun-sha, Tokyo, 1980); Yamazaki Tomoko, Sandakan Brothel No. 8: An Episode in the History of Lower-class Japanese Women (M. E. Sharpe, New York, 1999); James Warren, Ah Ku and Karayuki-san: Prostitution in Singapore 1870-1940 (Oxford University Press, 1993); and Bill Mihalopoulos, “The Making of Prostitutes: the Karayuki-san” in Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, Vol. 25, No. 1, 1993.
7
Okabe Naozaburd, Okabe Naozaburō Taishō no Nikki (Fuyō Shobō, Tokyo, 1982) p. 23.
8
Senda Kakō, Jūgun Ianfu, Seihen (Sanichi Shobō, Tokyo, 1978) pp. 26-29; Yoshimi Yoshiaki, Jūgun Ianfu (Iwanami Shoten, Tokyo, 1995) pp. 17-18.
9
Yoshimi Yoshiaki, Jūgun Ianfu, pp. 18-19.
10
Japanese National Public Record Office (hereafter JNPRO) Collection, Konsei Dai 14 Ryodan Shirēbu, Eisei Gyōmu Junpō, March 21-March 31, April 11-April 20, April 21-April 30, May 1-May 10, 1933; Rikugun Shō, Manshū Jihen Rikugun Eisei-shi, Vol. 4 (Rikugun Shō, Tokyo, 1935) June 1933 Section.
11
JNPRO Collection, Konsei Dai 14 Ryodan Shirēibu, Eisei Gyōmu Junpō, July 21-July 31, 1933.

-183-

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Japan's Comfort Women: Sexual Slavery and Prostitution during World War II and the U.S. Occupation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Figure and Tables xi
  • Plates xii
  • Foreword xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Author's Note xx
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Origins of the Comfort Women System 8
  • 2 - Procurement of Comfort Women and Their Lives as Sexual Slaves 33
  • 3 - Comfort Women in the Dutch East Indies 61
  • 4 - Why Did the Us Forces Ignore the Comfort Women Issue? 84
  • 5 - Sexual Violence Committed by the Allied Occupation Forces Against Japanese Women: 1945-1946 110
  • 6 - Japanese Comfort Women for the Allied Occupation Forces 133
  • Notes 183
  • Index 206
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