The Ethiopian Jewish Exodus: Narratives of the Migration Journey to Israel 1977-1985

By Gadi Benezer | Go to book overview

NOTE ON TRANSLITERATION AND FORM

No transliteration rules are followed uniformly for Hebrew, Amharic and Tigrinya words in the psychological, sociological, anthropological and historical works dealing with Ethiopia, Israel and Ethiopian Jews. I have thus followed what seems to be the most commonly used transcription in anthropological studies on Israel. However, in the interest of readability, I have used diacritical marks as sparingly as possible. The following system is thus used for the pronunciation of sounds in the non-English words:

Transcription

Pronunciation

a

father

ch

no close sound in English; as in German Bach, except for kessoch which is pronounced as with 'tch'

tch-in the middle of the word

church

tz-at the beginning of a word

tsetse, tswana (as in Botswana)

e

bet or encounter

o

Robert

i

lit

u

Judo, Sudan

I have tried to preserve the sound of words in Amharic and Tigrinya used by the interviewees. Thus, for example, I used the form of Tigray (not Tigre) for that place in Ethiopia, but Tigreans for the people of that area (not Tigrim as in the already Hebreicised form of the word). The Ethiopian term for outlaws or robbers, shifta, was used both for the singular and for the plural as it was employed by most of the interviewees, without the suffix '-och', as in kessoch, which symbolises the plural in Amharic.

As for foreign terms, they have been italicised, including the names of festivals, but the latter are also kept in capitals. Ethiopian names of authors have been kept as they are in Ethiopia, i.e. given (first) name and the father's first name as the offspring's last name. This is how they appear in the text as well as in the bibliography (unless otherwise known).

As for abbreviations, I have tried, as much as possible, not to use these in the text. I should note here that the abbreviation 'n.d.' stands in the bibliography for any reference that is not dated.

-xii-

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The Ethiopian Jewish Exodus: Narratives of the Migration Journey to Israel 1977-1985
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Note on Transliteration and Form xii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Context of the Journey 16
  • 3 - Interviewing and Interpreting in Crosscultural Research 39
  • 4 - The Theme of Jewish Identity 60
  • 5 - The Theme of Suffering 87
  • 6 - The Theme of Bravery and Inner Strength 120
  • 7 - The Impact of the Journey 152
  • 8 - Ethiopian Jews Encounter Israel 180
  • Concluding Remarks 199
  • Appendix 203
  • Notes 206
  • Bibliography 225
  • Index 247
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