Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen: Nature, Knowledge, Imagery in An Ancient Chinese Medical Text

By Paul U. Unschuld | Go to book overview

NOTES

I. BIBLIOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE SU WEN
1
While the Su wen and the Ling shu, since their first appearances in bibliographic references, have been transmitted through the centuries in more or less restructured versions, a third text belonging to this group, the Tai su, was lost in China, possibly during the later Song dynasty. Fragments permitting a reconstruction of major portions of the Tai su were found in Japanese libraries in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. Another title, Huang Di ming tang $ $, which is also counted among the Nei jing corpus, was lost by the Song era. For details on the Ling shu, see below, I.2, on the Tai su, see below, III.3, on the Ming tang, see below, III.1.
2
Zhao 1985: 6.
3
Quoted by Liu Changlin 1982: 16, from Chuan jia ji, Shu qi $, $. See also Ma Boying 1994: 248.
4
Liu Changlin 1982: 8.
5
See below p. 4.
6
Song 1950: 8.
7
Quoted by Liu Changlin 1982: 17, from Bu shang gu kao xin lu, Huang Di shuo $, $.
8
Song 1950: 6. Song Xiangyuan did not specify the author(s) of the article of 1928; he just gave its title, Zhong guo yi shu zhi zu (“The ancestors of Chinese medical literature”), and the journal it was published in: Tian jin yi shi bao yi yao zhou kan $. See also Shi 1940: 17, for a refutation of Huang Di's authorship of the Huang Di nei jing and for arguments to the effect that the textus receptus was compiled from pieces written by many different hands.
9
Liu Changlin 1982: 8–15.
10
Zhao 1985: 9. Similarly, Liu Chuanzhen: “Based on the analysis offered above, I conclude that the Nei jing was compiled for the most part during the middle or late period of the Western Han era. … Under these conditions, medical

-351-

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