The Longest Night: Polemics and Perspectives on Election 2000

By Arthur J. Jacobson; Michel Rosenfeld | Go to book overview

of the people, by the people, and for the people.” The vast array of constitutional amendments prohibiting discrimination in the franchise would make no sense if the states could simply abolish the right to vote across the board. The federal government is obligated to guarantee a “republicanU +201D form of government to the states, and in our time this would surely imply a recognition of the democratic franchise. The idea that the popular vote is a contingent matter, dependent on a choice by state legislatures, is hardly faithful to the legacy of Lincoln at Gettysburg.

Perhaps we should settle for a decision of the Supreme Court that affirms two principles born of the Civil War and rejects the third. But the American people and all peoples should take their democratic sovereignty seriously. The court and citizens of Florida care about whether Floridians should have been allowed to complete their electoral process without being told what their legislature “must have meant.” The election may have been settled, remarkably, without even a thought of taking up arms, but the nation will not forget.

The values of equality, nationhood, and democracy have become embedded in the American psyche. We now share these values with the numerous newly created democracies in the world that find inspiration in the American experience. The duty of Americans now is to make good on the example we have set for the world.


NOTES
1
3 U.S.C. § 5.
2
Id.
3
Bush v. Gore, 531 U.S. 98 (2000).
4
Bush, 121 S. Ct. at 538 (Rehnquist, J., joined by Scalia, J., and Thomas, J., concurring).
5
Palm Beach Canvassing Board v. Harris, 772 So.2d 1273, 1286 n.17 (Fla. 2000).
6
Gore v. Harris, 773 So.2d 524 (Fla. 2000).
7
Lochner v. New York, 198 U.S. 45, 76 (1905) (Holmes, J., dissenting).
8
Bush, 121 S. Ct. at 533.
9
Id. (“Seven Justices of the Court agree that there are constitutional problems [on equal protection grounds] with the recount ordered by the Florida Supreme Court that demand a remedy”).
10
Id.
11
Id. at 545 (Souter, J., dissenting); id. at 551, 557–58 (Breyer, J., dissenting).
12
Id. at 534 (“A significant departure from the legislative scheme for appointing Presidential electors presents a federal constitutional question”).
13
Id. at 535.
14
First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1861.

-248-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Longest Night: Polemics and Perspectives on Election 2000
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 417

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.