Coming into Her Own: Educational Success in Girls and Women

By Sara N. Davis; Mary Crawford et al. | Go to book overview

coming into her own
Educational Success in Girls and Women

Sara N. Davis
Mary Crawford
Jadwiga Sebrechts
Editors

Jossey-Bass Publishers
San Francisco

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Coming into Her Own: Educational Success in Girls and Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • About the Editors xi
  • About the Contributors xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • References 16
  • Part One - Women-Centered Education 19
  • 1 - The Contribution of Women's Studies Programs 23
  • Reference 34
  • 2 - The Women's College Difference 37
  • Reference 50
  • Part Two - Restructuring the Classroom 53
  • 3 - Feminist Teaching, an Emergent Practice 57
  • Notes 74
  • References 74
  • 4 - Teaching Through Narratives of Women's Lives 77
  • 5 - Studying Women's Lives in an Interdisciplinary Context 92
  • References 105
  • 6 - The Influence of the Personal on Classroom Interaction 107
  • References 121
  • 7 - Creating a Collaborative Classroom 123
  • Notes 136
  • References 137
  • 8 - Encouraging Participation in the Classroom 139
  • Notes 151
  • References 153
  • 9 - Overcoming Resistance to Feminism in the Classroom 155
  • References 169
  • Part Three - Transforming Math and Science 171
  • 10 - Creating Expectations in Adolescent Girls 175
  • 11 - Successful Strategies for Teaching Statistics 193
  • References 208
  • 12 - Mentoring the Whole Life of Emerging Scientists 211
  • Notes 223
  • Part Four - Changing Individual Expectations 225
  • 13 - Mentoring a Diverse Population 229
  • Reference 241
  • 14 - Advising Young Women of Color 244
  • Reference 257
  • 15 - Lessons from Self-Defense Training 260
  • Reference 273
  • Part Five - Creating Healthy Environments 275
  • 16 - Support Networks for Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Students 279
  • Reference 293
  • 17 - College Women and Alcohol Use 295
  • Reference 308
  • 18 - Preventing Dating Violence 311
  • Reference 325
  • 19 - Defining a Supportive Educational Environment for Low-Income Women 328
  • Reference 348
  • Index 351
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