Crusade Propaganda and Ideology: Model Sermons for the Preaching of the Cross

By Christoph T. Maier | Go to book overview
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APPENDIX: THE RELATIONSHIP
BETWEEN THE CRUSADE MODEL
SERMONS OF GILBERT OF TOURNAI
AND JAMES OF VITRY

THE DEPENDENCE of Gilbert of Tournai's ad status sermon models on those of James of Vitry has been noted before. In his study of Gilbert's Collectio de scandalis ecclesiae, Autbert Stroick for the first time clearly showed that Gilbert must have used James of Vitry's ad status collection for the Collectio as well as for his own ad status models.1 David d'Avray and Martin Tausche described in some detail Gilbert's reliance on James for his marriage sermons.2 Nicole Bériou did the same for the ad leprosos sermons.3 While he sometimes took over entire passages word for word, Gilbert was far from simply copying James's text. There is agreement that Gilbert used James's material very imaginatively. He usually designed his own model sermon with regard to both content and structure. He was fairly selective in choosing passages from James and often re-arranged them in a new order. In contrast to James of Vitry, Gilbert generally used a rigid scheme for ordering his argument. Bériou rightly pointed out that this was probably due to the influence of the mid-thirteenth-century university environment in which Gilbert wrote.4 With their clear structure and systematic use of distinctions, Gilbert's models certainly have a 'scholastic' feel to them.

The judgements pronounced on the resulting sermon texts vary. Studying the marriage sermons, d'Avray and Tausche were cautious

____________________
1
A. Stroick, 'Verfasser und Quellen der Collectio de Scandalis Ecclesiae (Reformschrift des Fr. Gilbert von Tournay, O.F.M., zum II. Konzil von Lyon, 1274)', Archivum Franciscanum Historicum, 23 (1930), 3–41, 273–99, 433–66, here pp. 280–92, 445–59. See also E. Longpré in the preface to his edition of Gilbert's Tractatus de Pace, xxiii, n. 1.
2
D'Avray and Tausche, 'Marriage Sermons', 85–117.
3
Bériou and Touati, Voluntate Dei Leprosus, 33–80, esp. 43–8.
4
Bériou and Touati, Voluntate Dei Leprosus, 48.

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