Exchange Rate Policies in Emerging Asian Countries

By Stefan Collignon; Jean Pisani-Ferry et al. | Go to book overview

EXCHANGE RATE POLICIES IN EMERGING ASIAN COUNTRIES

Edited by

Stefan Collignon, Jean Pisani-Ferry
and
Yung Chul Park

London and New York

-iii-

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Exchange Rate Policies in Emerging Asian Countries
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures xi
  • Tables xv
  • Editors' Introduction xx
  • Acknowledgements xxviii
  • 1 - Flexibility or Nominal Anchors? 3
  • 2 - Discussion 35
  • 3 - Exchange Rate Regimes and Policies 40
  • 4 - Discussion 65
  • References 68
  • 5 - Exchange Rate Policy and Effectiveness of Intervention 69
  • 6 - Discussion 105
  • 7 - Foreign Exchange Rate Fluctuations and Macroeconomic Management 109
  • 8 - Discussion 143
  • 9 - Industrialization and the Optimal Real Exchange Rate Policy for an Emerging Economy 149
  • 10 - Discussion 185
  • 11 188
  • 12 - Discussion 219
  • 13 - Measuring Exchange Rate Misalignments with Purchasing Power Parity Estimates 222
  • 14 - Discussion 243
  • 15 - Feers for the Nics 245
  • 16 - Discussion 280
  • 17 - Bloc Floating and Exchange Rate Volatility 285
  • 18 - Discussion 323
  • 19 - The Case for a Common Basket Peg for East Asian Currencies 327
  • 20 - Discussion 344
  • 21 - Is Asia an Optimum Currency Area? Can It Become One? 347
  • 22 - Discussion 367
  • 23 - Roundtable Discussion 369
  • 24 - The Currency Crisis in Thailand 389
  • Index 417
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