Interpreting Visual Culture: Explorations in the Hermeneutics of the Visual

By Ian Heywood; Barry Sandywell | Go to book overview

9

MY PHILOSOPHICAL PROJECT AND THE EMPTY JUG

David Michael Levin


My philosophical project

For quite a few years, I have been questioning vision, the gift of nature we call sight. My thinking in this regard has been guided by the hermeneutical method of phenomenology that Heidegger worked out in Being and Time, already announcing his decisive break with Husserl in the potentially very radical, very subversive formulation of his Introduction, because this method alone, I believe, truly and appropriately respects the reality of our experience as lived: it alone enables us to articulate this experience in a way that dynamically and creatively carries it forward; and it alone, therefore, appropriately legitimates and empowers subjectivity-beyond essentialism, beyond the will to power, beyond nihilism.

Since, for me, respecting experience involves questioning it, my thinking has not only been concerned with the articulation of our experience with sight, but has also attempted to put it into question, subjecting our experience as beings gifted with the capacity for looking and seeing to problematizations and challenges that draw on many different discursive domains of thought and enquiry.

This gift of nature-sight-is a capacity with a potential that can either be appropriately realized, developed and fulfilled or else be neglected, repressed, violated and denied appropriate cultivation and fulfilment. Since its realization, development and fulfilment are not predetermined by the conditions of nature, this task becomes the joint responsibility of the individual and society. Beyond the biological development of this capacity, there is also the ethical, moral, political and spiritual development of our vision-a telos which has been inscribed from time immemorial in the secrets of the flesh, and for which we as individuals must certainly assume some responsibility, but towards which we cannot hope to progress without the enabling conditions of our society and culture. Thus, when we ask, with Foucault, what kind of body-or what kind of gaze-our society and culture require of us, we must also ask what kind of society and culture the fulfilment of our potential for vision might need. With this question, of course, we can subject the conditions of our society and culture

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Interpreting Visual Culture: Explorations in the Hermeneutics of the Visual
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.