Interpreting Visual Culture: Explorations in the Hermeneutics of the Visual

By Ian Heywood; Barry Sandywell | Go to book overview
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SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

What follows is a sampling of recent literature on visuality and visual culture. The purpose of this bibliography is not to seek comprehensiveness, reminding colleagues, for example, of classic or standard texts. Nor do we wish to predefine issues and themes. Rather we have concentrated, for the most part, on recent works which are concerned explicitly with different aspects of visuality, or which seem to present interesting possibilities for application to the field of visual culture, crossing conventional boundaries between disciplines and intellectual areas. We wish to invite participants and readers to add to and construct their own 'working bibliography' in response to the questions raised in rethinking the visual in theory and practice from within their own concerns and disciplinary perspectives.

Introduction to the field of visual culture

K. Baynes, et al., eds, After Philosophy: End or Transformation (Cambridge: Mass.: MIT Press, 1987).
S. Benhabib and D. Cornell, eds, Feminism as Critique (Minneapolis: Minnesota University Press, 1987).
J. Bernstein, The Fate of Art: Aesthetic Alienation from Kant to Derrida and Adorno (Cambridge: Polity, 1992).
C. Jenks, ed., Visual Culture (London: Routledge, 1995).
M. Jay, 'Scopic Regimes of Modernity', in Scott Lash and Jonathan Friedman, eds, Modernity and Identity (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1992); also in Hal Foster, ed., Vision and Visuality (New York, 1988).
M. Jay, 'In the Empire of the Gaze: Foucault and the Denigration of Vision in Twentieth-Century French Thought', in D.C. Hoy, ed., Foucault: A Critical Reader (Cambridge: Basil Blackwell, 1986).
M. Jay, Downcast Eyes: The Denigration of Vision in Twentieth-Century French Thought (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993).
M. Jay Force Fields: Between Intellectual History and Cultural Critique (London: Routledge 1993).
D.M. Levin, ed., Modernity and the Hegemony of Vision (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993).

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