Renaissance in the Classroom: Arts Integration and Meaningful Learning

By Gail Burnaford; Arnold Aprill et al. | Go to book overview

Contributors

Connie Amon is the librarian and technology coordinator at Orozco School in Chicago. She is in her eighth year of teaching with Chicago Public Schools. Connie is married and the proud mother of a newborn son.

Andre LeMoine has been a teacher for the past 9 years in both parochial and public schools. He has often combined art and the study of literature and history. Andre has applied his love of painting and chess in various after school programs and has participated in the CAPE program for the past 2 years as a fourth-grade teacher at Orozco School.

Arnold Aprill is the executive director of the Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE), a network of public schools, arts organizations, and community organizations committed to arts integration in Chicago. He comes from a background in professional theater as an award-winning director, producer, and playwright. He has taught at the University of Chicago, Columbia College, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is one of the writers of the musical Sylvia's Real Good Advice based on Nicole Hollander's nationally syndicated comic strip Sylvia.

Gail Burnaford is an associate professor and director of Schools/Research Partnerships and Undergraduate Teacher Education at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Her research interests, in addition to arts integration, include teacher action research and curriculum design. She is the author of Teachers Doing Research: The Power of Action Through Inquiry and Image of Schoolteachers, both also published by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Gail is a singer and has sung with Robert Shaw and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus and Chamber Chorus, Basically Bach, and a variety of musical theater companies. She lives in Evanston, Illinois with her husband, David, and is the mother of two children, Maureen, a college student, and Brain, an actor.

Deb Diehl is one of the founders of Street Level Youth Media in Chicago, Illinois, and has been a leader in connecting media arts to school reform. She is currently teaching youth media for the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena, California.

Diane Deckert teaches fourth and fifth grade at Baker Demonstration School, a laboratory School affiliated with National-Louis University in Evanston, Illinois. Her interest in arts integration stems from her own experience working with poets, a choreographer, an actor, and visual artists to integrate art into her classroom teaching and from her work as a museum educator.

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