Renaissance in the Classroom: Arts Integration and Meaningful Learning

By Gail Burnaford; Arnold Aprill et al. | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

Beane, J. (1997). Curriculum integration: Designing the core of democratic education. New York: Teachers College Press.

Boston Globe. (2000). Harvard study casts doubt on 'Mozart Effect', Sept. 21.

Burns, P.C., Roe, B.D., & Ross, E.P. (1988). Teaching reading in today's elementary schools. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Catterall, J. (1997). Involvement in the arts and success in secondary school. Los Angeles: The UCLA Imagination Project.

Catterall, J. (1999). Achievement Data for CAPE schools. Unpublished preliminary report, Chicago Consortium for School Research.

Catterall, J. S., & Waldorf, L. (1999). Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education Summary Evaluation. In E. B. Fiske (Ed.), Champions of change: The impact of the arts on learning. The Arts Education Partnerships, The Presidents's Committee on the Arts and Humanities, GE Fund, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Cost, A. L., & Lowery, L. F. (1989). Techniques for teaching thinking: The practitioners' guide to teaching thinking series. Eric Document 404837.

Daniels, H., & Bizar, M.. (1998). Methods that matter: Six structures for best practice classrooms. York, ME: Stenhouse.

Earl, L. M., & LeMahieu, P. G. (1997). Rethinking assessment and accountability. In 1997 ASCD yearbook: Rethinking educational change with heart and mind (pp. 149–168). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Geertz, C. (1983). Local knowledge: Further essays in interpretative anthropology. New York: Basic Books.

Goldberg, M. (1997). Arts and learning: An integrated approach to teaching and learning in multicultural and multilingual settings. New York: Longman.

Herman, J. L., Aschbacher, P.R., & Winters, L. (1992). A practical guide to alternative assessment. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Hibbard, K.M., and others. (1996). A teacher's guide to performance-based learning and\assessment. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Keenan, D.L., & Edwards, C. (1992). Using the project approach with toddlers. Young Children, 47(4), 31–35.

Lawrence-Lightfoot, S., & Davis, J. H. (1998). The art and science of portraiture. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

McCaslin, N. (1990). Creative dramatics in the classroom (5th ed.). New York: Longman.

OMG, Inc. (1991). Understanding how the arts contribute to excellent education: Study prepared for the National Endowment for the Arts. Philadelphia, PA: Author.

Parks, M., & Rose, D. (1997). The impact of Whirlwind's reading comprehension through drama program on fourth-grade reading scores. Chicago: Whirlwind Performance Company.

Scales, P.C. (1991). A portrait of young adolescents in the 1990s: Implications for promoting healthy growth and development. Carrboro, NC: Center for Early Adolescence.

Wiggins, G. (1998). Educative assessment: Designing assessments to inform and improve student performance. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Wolf, D. P., & Pistone, N. (1991). Taking full measure: Rethinking assessment through the arts. New York: The College Board.

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