Renaissance in the Classroom: Arts Integration and Meaningful Learning

By Gail Burnaford; Arnold Aprill et al. | Go to book overview

References/Resources

Baquedaro, E. (1999). Aztec, Inca, and Maya. New York: Eyewitness Books.

Chrisp, P. (1999). The Maya. New York: Raintree/SteckVaughn.

Gerson, M.-J. (1995). People of the corn: A Mayan Story. New York: Little Brown and Co.

Lattimore, D. N. (1991). The flame of peace: A tale of the Aztecs. New York: HarperCollins.

Martinez, A. C. (1991). The woman who outshone the sun. New York: Children's Press.

McDermott, G. (1992). Papagayo. New York: Harcourt Brace.

McKissack, P. (1985). The Inca. New York: Children's Press.

Palacios, A. (1993). The hummingbird king: A Guatemalan legend. New York: Troll Associates.

Strohl, M., & Schneck, S. (1996). Mayas, Aztecs, Incas: Cooperative learning activities. New York: Scholastic Trade.


How to Read Codex

In Ancient Mexico—that is to say, before the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors—their lived the Aztecs or, as they called themselves, Mexica. They spoke Nahuatl—a language that many people in Mexico still speak today. Of the Mexica, there were many artists that dedicated their time to making books. These tlacuilos (scribes) drew their histories on paper made from the bark of trees, which the Mexica called Amatl. Histories were also written on strips of deerskin.


What were these books like?

Each book was made up of a long strip of paper folded like an accordion. With each fold you had one page. Each of these books is called a codex or tonalmatl.


What kind of things were recorded in these codixes?

Some were about history and religion, and others dealt with administrative matters.

The Mexica wrote stories using pictographs, glyphs, or hieroglyphs instead of words. In other words, they used pictures to communicate ideas. To read a codex is to read pictures. The Mexica would open up the long strip of paper and begin to read pictures, starting from the right side of the codex and moving toward the left. Part of this text was translated from Spanish. Como Leer un Codices by Esther Jacob.

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