Renaissance in the Classroom: Arts Integration and Meaningful Learning

By Gail Burnaford; Arnold Aprill et al. | Go to book overview

Appendix E:
Assessing Arts Integration by Looking at What Students Know and Are Able To Do

An Evaluation Instrument for CAPE Partnerships

INCREASING STUDENT CAPACITY—A CAPE GOAL

CAPE is providing initiative-wide assessment instruments and professional development to assist individual Partnerships in assessing student outcomes. The areas named below (a–g) have been named by the Department of Labor as necessary for success in the 21st century. They also serve as useful indicators for CAPE. They are yardsticks for Partnerships to plan, measure, and assess their growth and development. Each indicator must be addressed in terms of age of children, grade level, and degree of experience with arts integration. They are guidelines, not mandates. Remember, these are skills identified as necessary for success in a complex 21st century. We assume that you will also be assessing what students know through assessments in content areas and art forms. We hope that some of these assessments will integrate the art form(s) and the content fields that you are exploring.

You, your team or grade level, or entire school may decide to focus on several indicators in this evaluation at a time, rather than all of them at once. You may use them as focus points for conversations among teachers and artists. Clearly, some projects lend themselves more to one indicator than to another. They are meant to help Partnerships work toward useful outcomes for students. No one arts integration project can accomplish all outcomes. The indicators can also be used to look at projects and set goals over time in the Partnership. CAPE requests that you complete at least two of these evaluation instruments per year.

Choose one project or one unit to focus on for this evaluation. Please type responses wherever possible.

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