Renaissance in the Classroom: Arts Integration and Meaningful Learning

By Gail Burnaford; Arnold Aprill et al. | Go to book overview

Appendix F:
CAPE Checklists:
Strategies for Effective Arts Integration

Criteria for Effective Partnerships
One of the primary issues that arts education and curriculum development initiatives such as CAPE confront is how to plan and document innovative curricular work in a way that is DETAILED enough to be useful to other teachers, but is also FLEXIBLE enough to capture the originality and vitality of the work in action. The goal is to create living, breathing curriculum. Planning and documentation should be GENERATIVE, not PRESCRIPTIVE or PROSCRIPTIVE.The CAPE web site has tried to address this dilemma by distilling the principles that have consistently emerged in CAPE's most exciting practice. As you will see in the curriculum examples on the web site, the most effective curricular work developed by the CAPE Partnerships consistently exhibits the following strategies:
_____Clear identification of arts content, academic content, and learning skills that will be developed by the arts integrated curricular work
_____Identification of primary research and inquiry questions
_____Identification of a variety of hands-on approaches to generating and representing new knowledge
_____A clear understanding of how hands-on activities connect to applied analytical thinking
_____An expectation that students will draw on field research from sources outside the school
_____Articulated assessment methodologies
_____Opportunities for students to reflect on their work with their peers
_____Opportunities for students to make presentations about their new knowledge
_____Opportunities for students to teach what they have learned to others

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