Gender, Nature, and Nurture

By Richard A. Lippa | Go to book overview

CHAPTER
7

Gender, Nature, and Nurture:
Looking to the Future

Successful investigations of the process of gender embodiment must use three basic principles. First, nature/nurture is indivisible. Second, organisms—human and otherwise—are active processes, moving targets, from fertilization until death. Third, no single academic or clinical discipline provides us with the true or best way.

Sexing the Body
Anne Fausto-Sterling

Gender is complex; it changes over time. Figure 7.1 fleshes out this assertion by tracing several tracks of gender development, which proceed in tandem over an individual's life. These tracks include cascades of biological influences, family influences, peer influences, cultural and social influences, and influences originating from the individual's own ongoing thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.

Among the biological and genetic factors listed in Figure 7.1 are genes, prenatal sex hormones and brain organization, ongoing genetic and hormonal effects across the life span, hormonal and physical changes of puberty, and the biological processes of childbirth and parenthood. Family influences include parental socialization, sibling influences, and gender roles and stereotypes transmitted by families. Peer influences include the effects of classmates, friends, and coworkers. Broader social and cultural factors include teacher attitudes and influences, mass media effects, the structure of educational and work settings, and the influences of government, political, and social organizations. All these myriad influences come together to mold the behavior

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Gender, Nature, and Nurture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Gender, Nature, and Nurture xiv
  • Introduction xv
  • Chapter 1 - What''s the Difference Anyway? 1
  • Chapter 2 - Masculinity and Femininity- Gender within Gender 34
  • Chapter 3 - Theories of Gender 68
  • Chapter 4 - The Case for Nature 101
  • Chapter 5 - The Case for Nurture 130
  • Chapter 6 - Cross-Examinations 162
  • Chapter 7 - Gender, Nature, and Nurture- Looking to the Future 195
  • References 232
  • Author Index 263
  • Author Index 275
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