Britain and the Problem of International Disarmament, 1919-1934

By Carolyn J. Kitching | Go to book overview

2

THE CONCEPT AND CONTEXT OF DISARMAMENT, 1919-34

The concept of disarmament

Before embarking on a detailed analysis of British disarmament policy in the years 1919-34, it is important to define what exactly is meant, for the purposes of this study, by the term 'disarmament'. It has been used to cover all conditions, from the complete abolition of armaments, to the reduction of levels of armaments, and even to the increase in their level where the aim is to achieve a measure of limitation and control. It can thus be seen that the term is open to great misinterpretation, and in order to avoid such misinterpretation a number of political scientists, after the Second World War, began to use the term 'arms control' rather than the traditional 'disarmament' as the generic word for negotiations which sought to limit armaments by international agreement. Control of armaments, it was felt, removed the apparent anomaly of a 'disarmament' agreement which actually led to an increase in their level. As far as Hedley Bull, one of the most important of the British political scientists to adopt this phrase, was concerned, the aim was to counter the proponents of 'general and complete disarmament' such as Philip Noel-Baker. 1 The academic debate over 'disarmament' and 'arms control', however, did not really begin until the 1950s and so is not dealt with in the present study.

During the inter-war period the generic term 'disarmament' was used by politicians, diplomats, political scientists, journalists and the public alike to describe the limitation and control of armaments by international agreement, and this is the definition of the term used in the present study. The term was useful in that it could be used to describe all manner of situations and occasions-disarmament conventions, disarmament conferences, qualitative disarmament, quantitative disarmament, naval disarmament, land disarmament, chemical disarmament-it was a simple word to cover what, to the comparatively uninformed, was a simple concept. But once the concept began to be explored in depth, it became markedly less simple, and it is this confusion of interpretation which underpins the present study. Just what did disarmament mean to successive British governments during the

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Britain and the Problem of International Disarmament, 1919-1934
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Concept and Context of Disarmament, 1919-34 7
  • 3 - The Human Element 23
  • 4 - The Lloyd George Coalition Government, 1918-22 42
  • 5 - The Conservative Governments, 1922-3, and the First Labour Government, 1924 65
  • 6 - The Conservative Government, 1924-9 87
  • 7 - The Labour Government, 1929-31 115
  • 8 - The National Government, 1931-4 136
  • 9 - Conclusion 174
  • Notes 181
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 216
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 223

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.