The Partition of Bengal and Assam: Contour of Freedom

By Bidyut Chakrabarty | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY

The 1947 Great Divide of the subcontinent of India continues to generate interest among historian, regardless of their ideological persuasion. This was a dramatic event that registered the role of the British rulers, the Congress and Muslim League leadership, and the people who overnight became alien in an area that was declared 'foreign' following the formal articulation of the division of the subcontinent. A political decision, taken at the level of 'high' politics, radically altered the identity of those located in areas which changed their nomenclature after the 1947 vivisection. For those who left their homes, the bifurcation suddenly changed a geographical space into memory. Home became a distant object for those who underwent the trauma apart from the actual brutality that accompanied partition.

Thus partition is not merely an event; it is also the completion of a process that had become manifest in the ever-changing socio-economic and political environment of India under the Raj. The available literature is a pointer to that. Careful reading of the official sources (in the India Office Library, and Archives in India) clearly shows the shift in perceiving the Indian 'problem'. As long as Linlithgow was presiding over the empire, the idea of a separate Muslim state remained conceptual construction, especially in the aftermath of the 1940 Lahore resolution. The official documents of this phase, cited in the bibliography, are illustrative here. Wavell's arrival on the scene was certainly a break with the past because the perception that the empire was no longer viable gained ground. The Wavell Papers clearly identify the changed the direction of the British policy. Mountbatten's tenure as the (last) Viceroy demonstrates how the bifurcation was finally accomplished, taking into account the role of major political parties largely under his stewardship. As Mountbatten recorded everything about his role in this momentous event, his private papers are very useful in grasping (1) the British perception in quickly dismantling the Raj so assiduously maintained for the last 200 years and (2) the role of the Indian political actors representing the Congress, League and other major political parties in what virtually became a counter to bargain as

-253-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Partition of Bengal and Assam: Contour of Freedom
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables viii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Abbreviations x
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Hindu-Muslimdifferences 36
  • 2 - Divide and Rule 55
  • 3 - Politics of Accommodation and Confrontation 85
  • 4 - An Alternative to Partition 132
  • 5 - Redefining Borders 154
  • 6 - Construction and Consolidation of Identities 176
  • 7 - History of Partition or Partition of History? 209
  • Conclusion 239
  • Glossary 251
  • Bibliographical Essay 253
  • Bibliography 262
  • Index 273
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 278

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.