Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture

By Alex Hughes; Keith Reader | Go to book overview

Africanist Georges Balandier, who argued that while Lévi-Strauss's structural analysis might be appropriate to the small-scale communities he had studied in the rainforests of Brazil-societies with relatively little contact with the outside world-it was entirely inappropriate to the analysis of, for example, the substantially larger and rapidly changing societies of the African continent. The implication of this criticism was that anthropology should resist the temptation to idealize the exotic culture as an isolate untouched by history and instead attempt to understand the difficult process of the adaptation of traditional cultures to the modern world.

CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON


Further reading

b
Bonte, P. and Izard, M. (eds) (1992) Dictionnaire de l'ethnologie et de l'anthropologie [Dictionary of Ethnology and Anthropology], Paris: PUF (some useful entries on the history of French anthropology, with detailed biographies of its most eminent figures).

l
Lévi-Strauss, C. (1967) Les Structures élémentaires de la parenté, Paris and La Haye: Mouton & Co./Maison des Sciences de l'Homme. Translated J.H. Bell, J.R.von Sturmer and R. Needham (1969) The Elementary Structures of Kinship, Boston: Beacon Press.
--(1955) Tristes tropiques, Paris: Plon. Translated J. and D. Weightman (1984) Tristes tropiques, Harmondsworth: Penguin.
--(1958) Anthropologie structurale, Paris: Plon. Translated C. Jacobson and B. Grundfest Schoepf (1977) Structural Anthropology 1, Harmondsworth: Penguin.

m
Mauss, M. (1950) Essai sur le don, in Sociologie et anthropologie, Paris: PUF. Translated W.D. Halls (1990) The Gift, London and New York: Routledge.

Apostrophes

Television programme

A book programme, produced and presented by Bernard Pivot, on Antenne 2 (now France 2) on Friday evening, from January 1975 to June 1990 (724 programmes in all). This award-winning chat show, attracting audiences ranging from two to six million viewers, was credited with a highly significant and controversial influence on intellectual life (which was much criticized by Régis Debray). An appearance on Apostrophes could make or break a new book: the impact on sales was immediately visible in bookshops on Saturday morning. Pivot's appeal lay in his fair-minded independence, pitching discussion at a level accessible to a mass audience.

PAM MOORES

architecture, urban planning and housing after 1945

French architecture was traditionally inspired by a very strong classical tradition sustained by the state-backed École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, After about 1900, an alternative, modern architecture sprang up, partly on the basis of new, industrial techniques led by reinforced concrete. After 1914, classical styles largely disappeared, but they were replaced by eclectic treatments rather than by distinctively modern design, despite the efforts of leading modern architects such as Auguste Perret and Le Corbusier. Slow French economic growth in the 1930s contributed to this lack of clear progress. Even after 1945, reference to the past was implicit in many new buildings and planned layouts. The result was often inspired by order and symmetry, and sensitive, human treatment sometimes suffered.

Under the Vichy regime (1940-4), architecture looked back to traditional French society. After the Liberation, only the devastated areas

-18-

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Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface x
  • Introduction xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Classified Contents List xiv
  • A 1
  • Further Reading 3
  • Further Reading 13
  • Further Reading 18
  • Further Reading 26
  • Further Reading 27
  • Further Reading 30
  • B 44
  • Further Reading 66
  • Further Reading 70
  • Major Works 79
  • C 85
  • Further Reading 91
  • Further Reading 99
  • Further Reading 111
  • Further Reading 113
  • D 135
  • Further Reading 144
  • Further Reading 150
  • Major Works 152
  • E 168
  • Further Reading 194
  • F 197
  • Further Reading 200
  • Further Reading 207
  • Major Works 214
  • Further Reading 245
  • G 252
  • Further Reading 279
  • Further Reading 280
  • H 283
  • I 290
  • Further Reading 297
  • J 302
  • Further Reading 303
  • Major Works 307
  • K 310
  • Further Reading 317
  • L 318
  • Major Works 324
  • Major Works 325
  • M 350
  • Further Reading 352
  • Further Reading 354
  • Major Works 364
  • Further Reading 379
  • Further Reading 380
  • N 388
  • Further Reading 397
  • O 401
  • P 404
  • Further Reading 419
  • Major Works 424
  • Q 449
  • R 450
  • Further Reading 462
  • Further Reading 469
  • Major Works 470
  • Major Works 472
  • Further Reading 474
  • S 478
  • Further Reading 484
  • Further Reading 508
  • T 515
  • U 540
  • V 544
  • Further Reading 549
  • Further Reading 554
  • W 555
  • Further Reading 560
  • X 568
  • Y 569
  • Index 572
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