Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture

By Alex Hughes; Keith Reader | Go to book overview

D

Da Silva, Éric

b. 1957, Gennevilliers

Playwright, actor and director

The director of L'Emballage Theatre in Paris, Da Silva's career spans twenty years, including collective creations, the production of his own plays and the translations of several classics for the Théâtre de la Bastille and Théâtre de Gennevilliers. His plays include No Man's Man and Je ne pourrais pas vivre, si je croyais que je faisais du mal (I Couldn't Live if I Thought I Was Doing Wrong).

ANNIE SPARKS

See also: theatre

Daeninckx, Didier

b. 1949, Paris

Writer

Born in the working-class district of St-Denis on the northern outskirts of Paris, Daeninckx worked as a printer and local journalist before publishing in 1984 his first successful thriller Meurtres pour mémoire (Murders for The Record). His best fiction explores, within the thriller framework, the mechanisms of collective memory and amnesia relating to inglorious episodes in recent French history such as the Algerian war or the Occupation-see La Mort n'oublie personne (Death Forgets Nobody) of 1989. More recently, his essays have traced the hidden links between extreme Right and extreme Left, promoting his view of an essentially corrupt world occasionally redeemed by individual decency.

JILL FORBES

See also: detective fiction

dance

The dance heritage of France is an extremely rich and long-standing one which dates back to the reign of Louis XIV, where the court ballet reached its height. However, the history of dance in France this century has been somewhat chequered, often leaving French dance trailing behind recent developments in Germany, Britain and (particularly) America, especially with regard to the rise of modern and contemporary dance forms. None the less, the second half of the century has seen a dramatic turn around, enabling dance to have become reputedly the second most popular activity in France after football.

To understand this rapid expansion and the multifaceted nature of the current French dance scene, it is important to address three issues: the dominant role of classical ballet up to the end of the first half of this century; the consequent

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Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface x
  • Introduction xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Classified Contents List xiv
  • A 1
  • Further Reading 3
  • Further Reading 13
  • Further Reading 18
  • Further Reading 26
  • Further Reading 27
  • Further Reading 30
  • B 44
  • Further Reading 66
  • Further Reading 70
  • Major Works 79
  • C 85
  • Further Reading 91
  • Further Reading 99
  • Further Reading 111
  • Further Reading 113
  • D 135
  • Further Reading 144
  • Further Reading 150
  • Major Works 152
  • E 168
  • Further Reading 194
  • F 197
  • Further Reading 200
  • Further Reading 207
  • Major Works 214
  • Further Reading 245
  • G 252
  • Further Reading 279
  • Further Reading 280
  • H 283
  • I 290
  • Further Reading 297
  • J 302
  • Further Reading 303
  • Major Works 307
  • K 310
  • Further Reading 317
  • L 318
  • Major Works 324
  • Major Works 325
  • M 350
  • Further Reading 352
  • Further Reading 354
  • Major Works 364
  • Further Reading 379
  • Further Reading 380
  • N 388
  • Further Reading 397
  • O 401
  • P 404
  • Further Reading 419
  • Major Works 424
  • Q 449
  • R 450
  • Further Reading 462
  • Further Reading 469
  • Major Works 470
  • Major Works 472
  • Further Reading 474
  • S 478
  • Further Reading 484
  • Further Reading 508
  • T 515
  • U 540
  • V 544
  • Further Reading 549
  • Further Reading 554
  • W 555
  • Further Reading 560
  • X 568
  • Y 569
  • Index 572
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