Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture

By Alex Hughes; Keith Reader | Go to book overview

Major works

l
Lassalle, J. (1991) Pauses, Paris: Actes Sud (writings on the theatre, presented by Yannic Mancel).

Lavelli, Jorge

b. 1932, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Director

Lavelli is known for his contemporary repertoire. Director of the national Théâtre de la Colline until 1996, he is also known for his direction of opera, and of many Fernando Arrabal works.

ANNIE SPARKS

See also: theatre


Major works

s
Stagé, A. and Lavelli, J. (1979) Lavelli, opéra et mise à mort, Paris: Fayard (a discussion of work in the theatre).

Lavilliers, Bernard

b. 1946, St-Étienne

Singer-songwriter

Lavilliers's long career started in the 1970s, when a visit to South America profoundly influenced his style. Like many of his contemporaries, his musical itinerary saw him play blues, rock-in 1976's Haute Surveillance (Close Watch), for example-reggae and salsa in La Salsa (1980). He established himself in the 1980s; exoticism and protest songs are his hallmark. Charismatic on stage, with his cultivated working-class rocker look, he is a genuine poetic and political animal who never tires of discovering new musical horizons or exotic experiences, as expressed in his 1994 album, Champ du possible (Virtual Horizon).

GÉRALD POULET

See also: rock and pop; song/chanson

Le Corbusier

b. 1887, La Chaux-de-Fonds;

d. 1965, Roquebrune Cap-Martin

Architect, urban planner and writer, real name Charles-Édouard Jeanneret

Le Corbusier, an avant-garde Paris architect of Swiss origin, was the leading French member of the worldwide Modern movement in architecture between the 1920s and the 1960s. His villa designs in the 1920s and 1930s (e.g. Villa Savoye, 1931), his books, his housing projects and his city plans (e.g. Plan Voisin, 1925; Algiers, 1930; Radiant City, 1930-) had won him world renown by the 1950s but his practical achievements in France were limited, owing mainly to state indifference and distrust. However, Le Corbusier's designs and theories were based on his rigid concepts of universal relationships between people and space, and these tended to produce standardized designs for mass housing and city planning. He began to make these systems more flexible after the war-his chapel of Notre-Dame-du-Haut at Ronchamp (1955), for example-but a big postwar reconstruction scheme at St-Dié (1945) was rejected by residents and officials alike. Not until the 1950s, when France launched a big wave of high-rise housing in the public sector, were slab designs set in open space, comparable to his unité d'habitation (built at Marseille 1947-52), widely adopted on new housing estates. The city of towers and motorways came under criticism from the 1970s, but Le Corbusier's immaculate and persuasive architecture never lost its reputation and continues to influence French students and architects at the end of the century.

-324-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 619

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.