Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture

By Alex Hughes; Keith Reader | Go to book overview

M

M6

Television channel

This private television company, funded from advertising revenue, came into existence in 1987. Its predecessor, TV6, had been established as a dedicated music channel by the Socialist government one year earlier. M6 provides a general entertainment service with an emphasis on comedy, feature films and television series, much of it imported from the United States. Its principal shareholders are the Groupe Lyonnaise des Eaux and the Luxembourg media company, the Compagnie Luxembourgeoise de Télédiffusion. The channel diversified into programme production and other media-related activities in the early 1990s.

RAYMOND KUHN

See also: television

Madelin, Alain

b. 1948, Paris

Politician

Madelin is France's most avowedly 'Thatcherite' political figure, with the possible exception of Jean-Marie Le Pen. A Fascist militant in his Paris student days (his long-time political rival François Léotard claims to have had his first encounter with him on the wrong end of an iron bar), he soon mellowed into a political career on the right wing of the Parti Républicain that reached its apogee when Chirac, as a reward for Madelin's perhaps unexpected support in the 1995 presidential elections, appointed him Finance Minister. Madelin resigned after only a few months in the post, the better to concentrate on his ultimately unsuccessful attempt to win the leadership of the Parti Républicain. His privatizing fervour has also manifested itself in his writings, including Chers Compatriotes (My Fellow French) of 1994 and Quand les autruches relèveront la tête (When the Ostriches Look up) of 1995.

KEITH READER

See also: parties and movements

Maeght Foundation

The first private museum of modern art in France, and the first building designed expressly for the exhibition of modern art, the Maeght Foundation was opened on 28 July 1964 by André Malraux, then Minister for Cultural Affairs. Situated in the hilltop town of St-Paul de Vence, Alpes-Maritimes, it attracts over a quarter of a million visitors each year: its permanent collection comprises over 6,000 works, and it stages frequent temporary exhibitions.

-350-

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Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface x
  • Introduction xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Classified Contents List xiv
  • A 1
  • Further Reading 3
  • Further Reading 13
  • Further Reading 18
  • Further Reading 26
  • Further Reading 27
  • Further Reading 30
  • B 44
  • Further Reading 66
  • Further Reading 70
  • Major Works 79
  • C 85
  • Further Reading 91
  • Further Reading 99
  • Further Reading 111
  • Further Reading 113
  • D 135
  • Further Reading 144
  • Further Reading 150
  • Major Works 152
  • E 168
  • Further Reading 194
  • F 197
  • Further Reading 200
  • Further Reading 207
  • Major Works 214
  • Further Reading 245
  • G 252
  • Further Reading 279
  • Further Reading 280
  • H 283
  • I 290
  • Further Reading 297
  • J 302
  • Further Reading 303
  • Major Works 307
  • K 310
  • Further Reading 317
  • L 318
  • Major Works 324
  • Major Works 325
  • M 350
  • Further Reading 352
  • Further Reading 354
  • Major Works 364
  • Further Reading 379
  • Further Reading 380
  • N 388
  • Further Reading 397
  • O 401
  • P 404
  • Further Reading 419
  • Major Works 424
  • Q 449
  • R 450
  • Further Reading 462
  • Further Reading 469
  • Major Works 470
  • Major Works 472
  • Further Reading 474
  • S 478
  • Further Reading 484
  • Further Reading 508
  • T 515
  • U 540
  • V 544
  • Further Reading 549
  • Further Reading 554
  • W 555
  • Further Reading 560
  • X 568
  • Y 569
  • Index 572
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