Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture

By Alex Hughes; Keith Reader | Go to book overview

N

Namiand, Arlette

b. 1951, France

Playwright and director

A collaborator and dramaturg for Jean-Paul Wenzel at the Centre Dramatique National (CDN) at Les Fédérés, Montluçon, Namiand is the author of many works, some of them performed at the CDN and directed by Wenzel. They include Surtout quand la nuit tombe (Especially When Night Falls) and Sang blanc (White Blood). Her adaptations include works by Maupassant and Koestler.

ANNIE SPARKS

See also: theatre

National Cinematographic Centre

The Centre National de la Cinematographic (CNC) is a state institution created in 1946 and is the overseeing body for the French film industry. Notionally an autonomous decision-making body, it is composed of different committees whose remit is to foster the well-being of France's cinema by allocating funds to successful applications. It is charged with maintaining control over the financing of films, the receipts from box-office takings and statistics pertaining to the totality of film practices. The CNC manages funds that support the industry, the Compte de soutien, which takes two forms: the soutien automatique (1948) and the avance sur recettes (1960).

SUSAN HAYWARD

See also: cinema

national press in France

The French press reflects the country's geographical, cultural and political diversity in a wide range of publications, including local, regional and national newspapers, and a particularly thriving magazine sector which caters for every specialist interest and leisure pursuit. However, when compared to other nations, the French read relatively few dailies: only half as many as the British and Germans, and a quarter of the number read in Finland and Sweden. Despite a rich intellectual and political heritage, international comparisons of the number of dailies sold per capita place France in a lowly twenty-third position in the world rankings. Moreover, approximately 70 per cent of the total circulation of French dailies is accounted for by provincial titles.

The Paris-based daily press has declined dramatically since the beginning of the century. In 1914 there were eighty newspapers printing a total of 5.5 million copies each day. By 1939 the

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Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface x
  • Introduction xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Classified Contents List xiv
  • A 1
  • Further Reading 3
  • Further Reading 13
  • Further Reading 18
  • Further Reading 26
  • Further Reading 27
  • Further Reading 30
  • B 44
  • Further Reading 66
  • Further Reading 70
  • Major Works 79
  • C 85
  • Further Reading 91
  • Further Reading 99
  • Further Reading 111
  • Further Reading 113
  • D 135
  • Further Reading 144
  • Further Reading 150
  • Major Works 152
  • E 168
  • Further Reading 194
  • F 197
  • Further Reading 200
  • Further Reading 207
  • Major Works 214
  • Further Reading 245
  • G 252
  • Further Reading 279
  • Further Reading 280
  • H 283
  • I 290
  • Further Reading 297
  • J 302
  • Further Reading 303
  • Major Works 307
  • K 310
  • Further Reading 317
  • L 318
  • Major Works 324
  • Major Works 325
  • M 350
  • Further Reading 352
  • Further Reading 354
  • Major Works 364
  • Further Reading 379
  • Further Reading 380
  • N 388
  • Further Reading 397
  • O 401
  • P 404
  • Further Reading 419
  • Major Works 424
  • Q 449
  • R 450
  • Further Reading 462
  • Further Reading 469
  • Major Works 470
  • Major Works 472
  • Further Reading 474
  • S 478
  • Further Reading 484
  • Further Reading 508
  • T 515
  • U 540
  • V 544
  • Further Reading 549
  • Further Reading 554
  • W 555
  • Further Reading 560
  • X 568
  • Y 569
  • Index 572
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