Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture

By Alex Hughes; Keith Reader | Go to book overview

O

Obaldia, René d'

b. 1919, Hong Kong

Playwright

A 1960s playwright, whose works were successfully directed by Barsacq, Maréchal and Lavelli. L'Air du large (Sea Air), Le Général inconnu (The Unknown General) and the popular Du vent dans les branches du sassafras (Wind in the Sassafras Branches) number among the best known.

ANNIE SPARKS

See also: theatre

Ockrent, Christine

b. 1944, Brussels, Belgium

Broadcaster

Ockrent is France's leading and best-loved current affairs television presenter, extravagantly praised by Michel Foucault among others. Her programme A la une sur le 3 attracted large audiences from 1992 onwards. Her skilful interviewing techniques have contributed to her renown at least as much as her marriage to Bernard Kouchner.

KEITH READER

Oliver, Raymond

b. 1909, Langon;

d. 1990, Paris

Chef

From 1948, Oliver was owner of one of Paris's most fashionable restaurants, Le Grand Véfour, in the Palais-Royal. However, his fame springs less from this than from the fact that he was France's first television cook. At a time when programmes went out live and equipment lacked the sophistication of today's, this was a bold venture; he quickly became a household word, especially after the success of his best-selling book Le Cuisinier (1965). He refused to take part in a televised cooking contest with the British TV chef Fanny Craddock, stating that in his view women were not capable of great cuisine.

KEITH READER

See also: gastronomy

Ophuls, Marcel

b. 1921, Frankfurt, Germany

Director

The son of the film-maker Max Ophuls, Marcel became nationally known for the 1971 documentary The Sorrow and the Pity (Le Chagrin

-401-

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Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface x
  • Introduction xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Classified Contents List xiv
  • A 1
  • Further Reading 3
  • Further Reading 13
  • Further Reading 18
  • Further Reading 26
  • Further Reading 27
  • Further Reading 30
  • B 44
  • Further Reading 66
  • Further Reading 70
  • Major Works 79
  • C 85
  • Further Reading 91
  • Further Reading 99
  • Further Reading 111
  • Further Reading 113
  • D 135
  • Further Reading 144
  • Further Reading 150
  • Major Works 152
  • E 168
  • Further Reading 194
  • F 197
  • Further Reading 200
  • Further Reading 207
  • Major Works 214
  • Further Reading 245
  • G 252
  • Further Reading 279
  • Further Reading 280
  • H 283
  • I 290
  • Further Reading 297
  • J 302
  • Further Reading 303
  • Major Works 307
  • K 310
  • Further Reading 317
  • L 318
  • Major Works 324
  • Major Works 325
  • M 350
  • Further Reading 352
  • Further Reading 354
  • Major Works 364
  • Further Reading 379
  • Further Reading 380
  • N 388
  • Further Reading 397
  • O 401
  • P 404
  • Further Reading 419
  • Major Works 424
  • Q 449
  • R 450
  • Further Reading 462
  • Further Reading 469
  • Major Works 470
  • Major Works 472
  • Further Reading 474
  • S 478
  • Further Reading 484
  • Further Reading 508
  • T 515
  • U 540
  • V 544
  • Further Reading 549
  • Further Reading 554
  • W 555
  • Further Reading 560
  • X 568
  • Y 569
  • Index 572
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