Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture

By Alex Hughes; Keith Reader | Go to book overview

S

Sagan, Françoise

b. 1935, Cajarc, Lot

Writer and playwright

A popular novelist, Sagan has also written plays, short stories and volumes of autobiography. Of her numerous fictions, which frequently focus on women's experience of the pleasures and pain of love, two early novels-Bonjour tristesse (1954) and A Certain Smile (Un certain sourire) from 1956-are the best known. The first, written when Sagan was in her teens, won the Prix des Critiques, and established Sagan's international reputation. Sagan's work is usually considered as 'light'; however, her novels offer, arguably, significant insights into feminine psychology.

ALEX HUGHES

See also: literary prizes; women's/lesbian writing

Saint Laurent, Yves

b. 1936, Oran, Algeria

Fashion designer

Saint Laurent studied fashion design in Paris. In 1953, he was hired by Christian Dior and developed the 'trapeze' silhouette. In 1962, after being drafted by the French army for the French-Algerian conflict, he opened his fashion house. After introducing successively the cowboy and the sailor look, Saint Laurent turned to contemporary art and in 1965 launched his Mondrian dress. In 1966, he opened his first ready-to-wear boutique, Saint Laurent Rive Gauche. He mass-produced his clothes to make them accessible, and developed accessories, a men's line and perfumes.

JOËLLE VITIELLO

See also: Algerian war; fashion

Saint-Phalle, Niki de

b. 1930, Paris

Artist

Niki de Saint-Phalle first attracted attention with her 'rifle-shot' reliefs incorporating containers of paint which, when shot at by the viewer, would stain the surface-a parody of abstract art informel painting. A member of the Nouveau Réalisme group founded in 1960, she used objets trouvés to create playful reliefs and sculptures. The representation of women was the theme of her series of Brides and Nanas, huge, gaudily painted female figures, which culminated in a monumental, hollow, reclining woman, 28 m long, containing 'rooms' which

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Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface x
  • Introduction xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Classified Contents List xiv
  • A 1
  • Further Reading 3
  • Further Reading 13
  • Further Reading 18
  • Further Reading 26
  • Further Reading 27
  • Further Reading 30
  • B 44
  • Further Reading 66
  • Further Reading 70
  • Major Works 79
  • C 85
  • Further Reading 91
  • Further Reading 99
  • Further Reading 111
  • Further Reading 113
  • D 135
  • Further Reading 144
  • Further Reading 150
  • Major Works 152
  • E 168
  • Further Reading 194
  • F 197
  • Further Reading 200
  • Further Reading 207
  • Major Works 214
  • Further Reading 245
  • G 252
  • Further Reading 279
  • Further Reading 280
  • H 283
  • I 290
  • Further Reading 297
  • J 302
  • Further Reading 303
  • Major Works 307
  • K 310
  • Further Reading 317
  • L 318
  • Major Works 324
  • Major Works 325
  • M 350
  • Further Reading 352
  • Further Reading 354
  • Major Works 364
  • Further Reading 379
  • Further Reading 380
  • N 388
  • Further Reading 397
  • O 401
  • P 404
  • Further Reading 419
  • Major Works 424
  • Q 449
  • R 450
  • Further Reading 462
  • Further Reading 469
  • Major Works 470
  • Major Works 472
  • Further Reading 474
  • S 478
  • Further Reading 484
  • Further Reading 508
  • T 515
  • U 540
  • V 544
  • Further Reading 549
  • Further Reading 554
  • W 555
  • Further Reading 560
  • X 568
  • Y 569
  • Index 572
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