Rethinking Aggression and Violence in Sport

By John H. Kerr | Go to book overview

6

Taking the hard knocks

Children's and youth sport

This chapter examines aspects of the involvement of young athletes in team contact sports. It begins with a discussion of some of the difficulties that arise when adult models of sport are imposed on children's and youth sports. These include, for example, problems associated with a coach's emphasis on winning, young athletes' attitudes to the use of unsanctioned aggression and violence, and the moral responsibility of the coach. The chapter goes on to explain how reversal theory's metamotivational concepts can be used as a basis for developing optimal learning experiences for young athletes. In addition, it describes how young athletes learn to enjoy physical contact and charts the stages involved in this process, as well as providing an explanation of the psychological changes that accompany them. Finally, the problem of injuries involving young athletes in team contact sport is discussed, using the introduction of additional safety measures in Canadian ice hockey to illustrate how unexpected outcomes may occur.


The state of play in children's and youth sport

There is a difference between adult-organised sports for children, and youth-and child-organised activities that take place on the street or in the local park. In the latter, the emphasis is on playing and having fun, rules are minimal, scoring unimportant, the players are self-regulating and supervisory parents or officials unnecessary. In the former, the opposite is true; the emphasis is on taking the game seriously, rules are rigorously enforced by officials, winning is very important and coaches and parents dictate who plays, which position they play and for how long they play in any game. The elements of fun, playfulness and spontaneity that should be a part of children's and youth sport have diminished to such an extent that they have almost been totally obliterated (e.g. Gilroy, 1993; Smoll, 1986). For example, Michael McClenaghen (2003), involved in ice hockey coaching in Canada, drew attention to this problem in a letter to The Vancouver Sun newspaper, in which he stated:

It's time for us to stop talking about whether to allow body-checking in hockey programs where young participants are clearly not at the physical

-80-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rethinking Aggression and Violence in Sport
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Figures and Tables x
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • 1 - The State of Play 1
  • 2 - Getting Started with Reversal Theory 19
  • 3 - New Beginnings 38
  • 4 - The Joy of Physical Contact 46
  • 5 - When Things Turn Ugly 66
  • 6 - Taking the Hard Knocks 80
  • 7 - Beyond the Pale 94
  • 8 - Blood and Guts 114
  • 9 - The Final Whistle 134
  • Author Index 152
  • Subject Index 156
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 159

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.