Walking Ghosts: Murder and Guerrilla Politics in Colombia

By Steven Dudley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 11

THE HOUSE OF CASTAÑO

During those first bloody years, the UP simply tried to survive the onslaught. But there was no clear strategy on how to deal with the attacks. The killings were happening so often that the party was left constantly off balance. Some party militants eventually took refuge, but many others stuck out their chests and waited for the bullets to come. Throughout, the party pressured the government to comply with the treaty it had signed with the FARC, the Uribe Agreement. "The Government, in accordance with the Constitution and the laws, will give the Unión Patriótica the guarantees and security it needs so that it can campaign as well as participate in elections in the same way other political parties do," the 1984 agreement read. "The government will use all the force of the law against any citizen or authority that inhibits these rights or denies, ignores, or refuses to recognize the rights that they [the members of the new party] have."

Of course, now that the peace process had ended, it wasn't clear whether this agreement was still valid. Still, the UP, in particular the burgeoning social democrats in the party, the so-called Perestroikas, made every effort to hold the government to its word. After all, the party remained legal, even if its former armed wing was now on the offensive against the state again.

During this time, UP president Bernardo Jaramillo and other party leaders met with members of the cabinet, military officers, diplomats, and anyone else they thought could slow the pace of the killing. Everyone shook hands, nodded heads, and said the right things: The government promised more protection; the army declared it would crack down on human rights abusers; and the diplomats said they would consider sanctions. But nothing ever happened. The UP kept falling, and the monster that was the paramilitaries kept growing. To slow the killing, the UP finally decided, someone else besides the government would have to stop these drug-financed death squads.

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Walking Ghosts: Murder and Guerrilla Politics in Colombia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 253

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.