Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Philosophers

By Stuart Brown; Diané Collinson et al. | Go to book overview

Main publications:
(1892) Hendrik Ibsens Frauengestalten [Hendrik Ibsen's Female Characters], Jena: Eugen Diederichs.
(1894) Friedrich Nietzsche in seinen Werken [Friedrich Nietzsche in his Works], Vienna: Carl Conegen (English translation, Nietzsche, ed. and trans. Siegfried Mandel, Redding Ridge: Black Swann Books, 1988).
(1910) Die Erotik [The Erotic], Frankfurt: Rutten & Loening.
(1925) Rainer Maria Rilke Leipzig: Insel.
(1958) In der Schule bei Freud [The Freud Journal], ed. Ernst Pfeiffer, Zurich: Max Niehans (English translation, The Freud Journal of Lou Andreas-Salomé, trans. S.A. Leavy, London: The Hogarth Press and The Institute of Psycho-Analysis, 1965).

Secondary literature:
Binion, Rudolf (1968) Frau Lou, Nietzsche's Wayward Disciple, Princeton.
Livingstone, Anglea (1984) Lou Andreas-Salomé, London: Gordon Fraser.
Martin, Biddy (1991) Woman and Modernity: The (Life) Styles of Lou Andreas-Salomé, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
Peters, H.F. (1962) My Sister, My Spouse, New York: Norton.
Pfeiffer, Ernst (ed.) (1951) Lebensruckblick, Zurich: Max Niehans (autobiography).

Andreas-Salomé wrote widely in philosophy, literary criticism fiction, and psychoanalysis. She was active and influential in intellectual circles at the turn of the century. In particular, her thought contributed to the ideas of Friedrich Nietzsche, Paul Rée, Rainer Maria Rilke and Sigmund Freud, all of whom she knew well.

Andreas-Salomé's important study of the stages of Nietzsche's thought, Friedrich Nietzsche in seinen Werken (1894), has the central thesis that his outer, intellectual life is an expression of his inner, psychological life. In her critique of his philosophical ideas, she argued that the Übermensch is both unattainable and destructive. Despite her critical remarks, she embraced much of his anti-foundationalist thought, including the rejection of universal moral truth.

Andreas-Salomé's psychoanalytic writings bring together her early interest in religion and her later ideas on love, sexuality and femininity. In her theory of narcissism, love and sex are a reunion of the self with its lost half. Love is directed back at ourselves because the lost self is actually an ideal image created from ourselves. But the union of the self and the ideal image also represents a union of the individual self with Spinozan Nature (or God). With Nietzsche, she believed that God is dead, but she added that he has an afterlife in the exalted human feelings that endure after the ideal (God) created by humans is replaced. These life-enhancing feelings are characteristic of narcissistic love which constitutes, especially for women, a progressive expansion of the self.

EMILY BRADY


Androutsos, Christos

Greek, b: 1869, Kios (Asia Minor), d: 1935, Athens. Cat: Philosopher and theologian; Platonic scholar. Ints: History of ancient thought; philosophical psychology; ethics; philosophy of religion. Educ: Theological School of Halki and University of Leipzig. Infls: Plato, Wilhelm Wundt and Greek Orthodox dogmatics. Appts: Taught at the Theological School of Halki (1895-7, 1901-5); Marasleion Teachers' Training College, Athens (1906-11); Professor of Dogmatic and Christian Ethics, University of Athens (1912-35).


Main publications:
(1895-97) The Concept of Evil in Plato vol. 1 The Concept of Evil, Athens; vol. 2, The Origin of Evil, Constantinople).
(1903) Plato's Theory of Knowledge in Itself and in Relation to the Philosophers Before Him, Athens.
(1909) Critique of the Fundamental Dogmas of Stoic Philosophy, Athens.
(1925) System of Ethics, Athens.
(1929) Dictionary of Philosophy, Athens.
(1931) On Freud's Psychoanalysis, Athens.
(1934) General psychology, Athens.

Androutsos criticized the neo-Kantian reading of Plato popular among German philosophers of his times, stressing the ontological significance of the Platonic ideas. Again, Androutsos was the most characteristic representative of the philosophical ideas of the Greek Orthodox Church. An exponent of personalism in ethics, he aimed to provide a religious foundation for philosophical ethics. His Dictionary of Philosophy (1929) is a remarkable attempt to establish a philosophical terminology in modern Greek.

STAVROULA TSINOREMA


Anscombe, G(ertrude) E(lizabeth) M(argaret)

British, b: 1919. Cat: Analytic philosopher. Ints: Philosophy of mind; ethics; metaphysics; philo

-25-

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Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Philosophers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • List of Abbreviated Sources xvi
  • List of Schools and Movements xxi
  • A 1
  • Main Publications: 19
  • Main Publications: 22
  • Main Publications: 24
  • Main Publications: 25
  • Main Publications: 29
  • B 41
  • Main Publications: 97
  • C - Cabral, Amilcar Lopes 119
  • Main Publications: 148
  • D 167
  • E 209
  • F 222
  • G 261
  • H 296
  • Main Publications: 323
  • Main Publications: 330
  • I 361
  • Main Publications: 365
  • J 370
  • Main Publications: 385
  • K 387
  • Main Publications: 405
  • Main Publications: 423
  • L 425
  • M 486
  • Main Publications: 491
  • Main Publications: 498
  • Main Publications: 540
  • N 558
  • Main Publications: 577
  • O 583
  • P 593
  • Main Publications: 605
  • Main Publications: 614
  • Main Publications: 626
  • Q 640
  • R 644
  • Main Publications: 657
  • S 690
  • Main Publications: 701
  • Main Publications: 704
  • T 764
  • U 795
  • V 800
  • W 817
  • Main Publications: 827
  • Main Publications: 833
  • Main Publications: 851
  • X 853
  • Y 857
  • Z 861
  • Guide to Schools and Movements 876
  • Bibliography 893
  • Nationality Index 903
  • Category Index 909
  • Index of Interests 918
  • Index of Influences 925
  • Index of People 936
  • Index of Subjects 945
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