Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Philosophers

By Stuart Brown; Diané Collinson et al. | Go to book overview

J

Jabès, Edmond

French, of Italian-Jewish parents, b: 1912, Cairo. d: 2 January 1991, Paris. Cat: Stockbroker; author; existentialist; philosopher of language. Ints: Literary theory and Judaisim; the Jew as 'other'. Educ: Paris. Infls: Surrealism; his own role in the French Resistance and his nomadic life. Appts: Participated in French Resistance, 1939; fled to Egypt, working as stockbroker and writing for surrealist periodicals; after Suez Crisis returned to France, 1957.


Main publications:
(1973) El, ou Le Dernier Livre, Paris: Gallimard.
(1976-84) The Book of Questions, trans. Rosemarie Waldrop, 7 vols, Middeletown: Wesleyan University Press; originally published as Le livre des questions, 1963.
(1976) Le Livre des Ressemblances, Paris: Gallimard.
(1965; 1965-72) Le Retour au Livre, 3 vols, Paris: Gallimard.
(1978) Le Soupçon, Le Désert, Paris: Gallimard.
(1991) From the Book to the Book, an Edmond Jabès Reader, trans. Rosmarie Waldrop et al., Hanover, NH: University Press of New England.

Secondary literature:
(1989) Écrire le Livre (conference proceedings), Seyssel, Champ Vallon.
Blachot, Maurice (1969) L'entretien infini, Paris: Gallimard.
Caws, M.A. (1988) Edmond Jabès, Amsterdam: Rodopi.
Derrida, Jacques (1978) 'Edmond Jabès and the question of the book', in Writing and Difference, trans. A. Bass, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 64-78 (French original, L'Écriture et la Différence).
Handelman, Susan (1991) Fragments of Redemption, Bloomington: Indiana University Press (bibliography, p. 370).
Hoffman, A.G. (1991) Between Exile and Return, Albany: SUNY Press.
Laifer, M. (1986) Edmond Jabès, New York: P. Lang.

The aim of Jabès' work (often written in the form of poems or other non-philosophical genres) is to define Judaism in terms of the written word, or text. He even states that to write is to be Jewish, Judaism being an allegory of the 'difference', or 'exile', experienced by the writer. Like Derrida and Levinas he combines various literary devices and subjects to form one piece, juxtaposing phrases culled from Jewish tradition with those from literary and philosophical sources. He has been commented on in a variety of countries and languages, two of the most impressive interpretations being by Derrida and Maurice Blanchot.

Sources: Schoeps; NUC; CPBI.

IRENE LANCASTER


Jackson, Frank Cameron

Australian, b: 31 August 1943, Melbourne. Cat: Analytic philosopher. Ints: Philosophical logic; cognitive science; epistemology; metaphysics; meta-ethics. Educ: Melbourne University and La Trobe University. Infls: A.C.Jackson, D.M. Armstrong, J.J.C. Smart and M.C. Bradley. Appts: 1967, Temporary Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Adelaide; 1968-77, Lecturer, then Senior Lecturer, then Reader, La Trobe University; 1978-86, Professor of Philosophy, Monash University; 1986-90 and 1993-, Professor of Philosophy, Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University; 1991-2, Professor of Philosophy, Monash University; 1992-, Professor of Philosophy, R.S.S.S., Australian National University, 1994-5, John Locke Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Oxford.


Main publications:
(1974) 'Defining the autonomy of ethics', Philosophical Review 83:89-96.
(1976) 'The existence of mental objects', American Philosophical Quarterly 13:33-40.
(1977) Perception: A Representative Theory, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
(1982) 'Epiphenomenal qualia', Philosophical Quarterly 32:127-36.
(1986) 'What Mary didn't know', Journal of Philosophy 83:291-5; with Postscript in P. Moser and J. Trout (eds), Contemporary Materialism, London: Routledge, 1995.

-370-

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Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Philosophers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • List of Abbreviated Sources xvi
  • List of Schools and Movements xxi
  • A 1
  • Main Publications: 19
  • Main Publications: 22
  • Main Publications: 24
  • Main Publications: 25
  • Main Publications: 29
  • B 41
  • Main Publications: 97
  • C - Cabral, Amilcar Lopes 119
  • Main Publications: 148
  • D 167
  • E 209
  • F 222
  • G 261
  • H 296
  • Main Publications: 323
  • Main Publications: 330
  • I 361
  • Main Publications: 365
  • J 370
  • Main Publications: 385
  • K 387
  • Main Publications: 405
  • Main Publications: 423
  • L 425
  • M 486
  • Main Publications: 491
  • Main Publications: 498
  • Main Publications: 540
  • N 558
  • Main Publications: 577
  • O 583
  • P 593
  • Main Publications: 605
  • Main Publications: 614
  • Main Publications: 626
  • Q 640
  • R 644
  • Main Publications: 657
  • S 690
  • Main Publications: 701
  • Main Publications: 704
  • T 764
  • U 795
  • V 800
  • W 817
  • Main Publications: 827
  • Main Publications: 833
  • Main Publications: 851
  • X 853
  • Y 857
  • Z 861
  • Guide to Schools and Movements 876
  • Bibliography 893
  • Nationality Index 903
  • Category Index 909
  • Index of Interests 918
  • Index of Influences 925
  • Index of People 936
  • Index of Subjects 945
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