Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Philosophers

By Stuart Brown; Diané Collinson et al. | Go to book overview

Main publications:
The first complete English edition of Jung's works was published by Routledge & Kegan Paul, Ltd., in England, and by the Bollinger Foundation in the United States. The American edition (number XX in the Bollinger series) has been published since 1967 by Princeton University Press. This edition, under the editorship of Sir Herbert Read, Michael Fordham, Gerhard Adler and W. McGuire, includes extensive revisions (supervised by Jung), new translations (mostly by R.F.C. Hall) and a number of works not previously published in English.
(1912) Freud and Psychoanalysis; reprinted in vol. 4 of Jung's Collected Works, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul , 1961.
(1912) Symbols of Transformation; reprinted in vol. 5 of Jung's Collected Works, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1961.
(1913) The Practice of Pyschotherapy, reprinted in vol. 16 of Jung's Collected Works, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1961.
(1921) Psychologische Typen Zurich: Raschne.
(1928) Two Essays on Analytical Psychology, authorized translation by H.G. and C.F. Baynes, London: Bailliere, Tindall & Cox.
(1933) Modern Man in Search of a Soul, London: K. Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.
(1934) Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious; revised edition, 1954; reprinted in vol. 9, part 1 of Jung's Collected Works, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1961.
(1934) The Development of Personality, reprinted in vol. 17 of Jung's Collected Works, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1961.
(1939) The Integration of the Personality, New York: Farrar & Rhinehart Inc.
(1940) Psychologie und Religion Zurich: Raschner.
(1963) Memories, Dreams, Reflections (autobiography), ed. A. Jaffe, London: Collins and Routledge & Kegan Paul.
(1964) Man and His Symbols, London: Arkana.

Secondary literature:
Adler, G. (ed.) (1973-4) C.G. Jung Letters, vols 1 and 2, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
Eysenck, H.J. (1953) The Structure of Human Personality, London: Methuen & Co.; in University Paperback Series, 1970.
Fordham, F. (1953) An Introduction to Jung's Psychology, Baltimore: Penguin Books.
Jacobi, J. (1959) The Psychology of C.G. Jung, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
Samuels, A. (1985) Jung and the Post-Jungians, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
Storr, A. (1983) Jung: Selected Writings, London: Fontana.
Wilmer, H.A. (1987) Practical Jung: Nuts and Bolts of Jungian Psychotherapy, Wilmett, Ill.: Chiron Publications.

Along with Freud and Adler, Jung was one of the founders of psychoanalysis. The son of a Protestant clergyman, he considered archaeology before deciding to qualify as a doctor. He travelled widely in Africa, America and India. Notoriously, when the Nazi party came to power he replaced Ernst Kretschmer as the President of the German Society for Psychotherapy. Jung was impressed by Freud's early writings and the two became friends and collaborators in the opening years of the psychoanalytic movement. By 1914, however, after a series of increasingly bitter (mostly on Freud's side) disputes, Jung had broken away to found his own school of psychoanalysis, Analytical Psychology. Like Freud, Jung was concerned with the significance of the unconscious mind: that is, mental contents to which we do not have direct access by ordinary introspection, yet which may profoundly influence conscious experience and behaviour. However, Jung sought to extend the possible content of the unconscious well beyond the limits set by what was already becoming the Freudian orthodoxy. In his early work Freud restricted unconscious material to repressed experiences, arising especially from infantile sexuality. In Jung's analytical psychology on the other hand, unconscious material could take many different forms and arise both from individual experiences and from racial or collective memories.

The notion of a collective unconscious enabled Jung to combine his interests in anthropology and religion with his clinical work. He noted that his patients often spoke in terms of images and symbols which echoed those he had already found to be common in widely different cultures. It seemed to him wholly implausible that these represented experiences which each of his patients had individually repressed. Rather they had to be a reflection of 'archetypes' which had become built into our collective unconscious through evolutionary processes. Individual experiences are also significant in Jungian theory, but they are to be understood as interacting with inherited archetypes. In child development, for example, the way parents actually behave towards their children is important. But the child's perception of this behaviour is in part determined also by inherited archetypal structures. In this instance these include the 'animus' (the girl's archetypal image

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Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Philosophers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • List of Abbreviated Sources xvi
  • List of Schools and Movements xxi
  • A 1
  • Main Publications: 19
  • Main Publications: 22
  • Main Publications: 24
  • Main Publications: 25
  • Main Publications: 29
  • B 41
  • Main Publications: 97
  • C - Cabral, Amilcar Lopes 119
  • Main Publications: 148
  • D 167
  • E 209
  • F 222
  • G 261
  • H 296
  • Main Publications: 323
  • Main Publications: 330
  • I 361
  • Main Publications: 365
  • J 370
  • Main Publications: 385
  • K 387
  • Main Publications: 405
  • Main Publications: 423
  • L 425
  • M 486
  • Main Publications: 491
  • Main Publications: 498
  • Main Publications: 540
  • N 558
  • Main Publications: 577
  • O 583
  • P 593
  • Main Publications: 605
  • Main Publications: 614
  • Main Publications: 626
  • Q 640
  • R 644
  • Main Publications: 657
  • S 690
  • Main Publications: 701
  • Main Publications: 704
  • T 764
  • U 795
  • V 800
  • W 817
  • Main Publications: 827
  • Main Publications: 833
  • Main Publications: 851
  • X 853
  • Y 857
  • Z 861
  • Guide to Schools and Movements 876
  • Bibliography 893
  • Nationality Index 903
  • Category Index 909
  • Index of Interests 918
  • Index of Influences 925
  • Index of People 936
  • Index of Subjects 945
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