Transforming Rural China: How Local Institutions Shape Property Rights in Rural China

By Chih-Jou Jay Chen | Go to book overview

Notes

1

Explaining property rights transformations
1
To protect the anonymity of the villages and interviewees, this study has changed the names of the villages and people mentioned in this book. Real names are used for administrative divisions above the village level (e.g., township and county) and for public figures at the national level.
2
Approximately 4 million overseas Chinese, one fifth of the total overseas Chinese population, trace their origins to southern Fujian Province.
3
During the Great Leap Forward, CBEs were called on to produce industrial goods needed by agriculture. The major guidelines in this period included "selfreliance" (communes should rely on their own resources to develop CBEs), and "three locals," i.e., CBEs should use local raw materials, process them locally, and distribute the products locally. During the Cultural Revolution decade, between the early 1960s and early 1970s, some rural enterprises were set up at the commune and brigade levels but were restricted in the "five small indus-tries," i.e., locally operated small- and medium-scale enterprises that use intermediate technology to produce iron and steel, cement, energy (coal and hydroelectricity), chemical fertilizers, and agricultural machinery. However, grain production was emphasized at the expense of other rural activities (Mo 1987; Wong 1982).

2

The Yangtze Delta in the reform era
1
There has been an extensive literature on the Sunan model. Detailed historical background and case studies about its TVEs development in the reform era can be found in Byrd and Lin (1990); Fei (1984, 1989); Wong et al. (1995); Ma et al. (1994); Ho (1994); Kung (1999); Hook (1998); Whiting (2001); Tao (1988); Song (1994); Zhou and Zhang (1991); Wei (2000).
2
In China, different bureaucracies and government departments (for example, the statistics bureau and agricultural bureau) compiled statistics and usually report disagreeing sets of statistics.
3
The principal coordinator of this research project was Nan Lin, who collaborated with Lu Hanlong at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences. I participated in the design of questionnaire, joined, and supervised the survey in Shanghai suburbs during the summers of 1993 and 1994, and independently conducted several rounds of in-depth interviews in the following years in some of the survey's sampled villages.
4
The questionnaire inquired into a wide range of detailed information about the village and the village's enterprises, as well as information about property rights arrangements and the background of key personnel. In addition, the

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Transforming Rural China: How Local Institutions Shape Property Rights in Rural China
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations x
  • Acknowledgments xii
  • Abbreviations xiv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Explaining Property Rights Transformations 7
  • Part I - The Yangtze Delta Property Rights Transformations 31
  • 2 - The Yangtze Delta in the Reform Era 33
  • 3 - The Yangtze Delta in the Postreform Era 70
  • 4 - Shuang Village 100
  • Part II - Southern Fujian Property Rights Transformations 125
  • 5 - Southern Fujian Under Economic Reforms 127
  • 6 - Hancun Village 160
  • 7 - Conclusion 178
  • Notes 188
  • Bibliography 194
  • Index 208
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