European Union: Power and Policy-Making

By Jeremy J. Richardson | Go to book overview

more in line with national administrative styles and traditions. The philosophy behind this new approach is that it will lead to more effective implementation and will cause much less hostility to the EU as a 'nanny' state. There is, of course, a perfectly respectable argument for decentralisation and flexibility as a means of improving implementation. Indeed, Scharpf argues that if European integration depends on policy co-ordination (as, surely, it does), 'there is a need for co-ordination techniques which impose minimal constraints on the autonomous problem solving capacities of the member states'. However, he adds the crucial caveat that 'these, in turn, depend on the willingness of member states to pursue their own policy goals in ways which impose minimal constraints on free movement within the European market'(Scharpf 1994:219). This is a perfectly laudable aim and Scharpf cites examples of cases of technical interdependence where compromises have been reached between the technically optimum solutions and the constraint of avoiding too great a sacrifice in national autonomy. However, cynics familiar with the horror stories of the EU's implementation record to date might be forgiven for seeing subsidiarity as Euro-jargon for an extended licence to cheat. Rather than improved implementation, we are likely to uncover mass graves for EU policies, rather than the mere skeletons in the cupboard that have been discovered so far!


REFERENCES

b
Bardach, E. (1977) The Implementation Game, Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

c
Court of Auditors (1992) 'Special Report no. 3/92 Concerning the Environment Together with the Commission's Replies', Official Journal, 92/C245/Vol. 35.
Court of Auditors (1994) 'Special Report 4/93 on the Implementation of the Quota System Intended to Control Milk Production', 03, 94/C12/Vol. 37.

d
Dunsire, A. (1978) Implementation in a Bureaucracy, Oxford: Martin Robertson.

e
European Commission (1995a) Quality of Bathing Water 1994, EUR 15976 EN, Brussels.
European Commission (1995b) Twelfth Annual Report on Monitoring the Application of CommunityLaw (1994), COM(95) 500. Final. Brussels.

g
George, Stephen (1984) An Awkward Partner: Britain and the European Community, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
George, Stephen (1996) 'The Approach of the British Government to the 1996 Intergovernmental Conference of the European Union', Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 3, no. 1, pp 45-62.
Grant, Wyn (1995) 'The Limits of Common Agricultural Policy Reform and the Option of Denationalization', Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 1-18.
Gunn, Lewis (1978) 'Why is Implementation so Difficult?', Management Services in Government, 33, p. 169-176.

h
Haigh, Nigel (1995) Manual of Environmental Policy: The EC and Britain, London: Catermill Publishing.
Héritier, Adrienne (1996) 'The Accommodation of Diversity in European Policy-Making and its Outcomes: Regulatory Policy as Patchwork', Journal of European Public Policy, Vol 3, no 3, pp. 149-167.
Hogwood, Brian, W. and Gunn, Lewis, A. (1984) Policy Analysis for the Real World, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Hood, Christopher (1976) The Limits of Administration, London, Wiley. Ionescu, Ghita (1988) 'The Application of Law and the Community Perspective' in Siedentopf and Ziller (1988) Making European Policies, pp. 202-208.

k
Kettl, Donald, F. (1979) 'Can the Cities be Trusted?', Political Science Quarterly, Vol. 94, no. 3, pp. 437-451, 609.

l
Lefevere, Jorgen (1995) 'Laying Down the Law to Europe's Draftsmen', European Brief, Vol. 2, no. 5, pp. 19-20.
Lundquist, Lennart (1972) 'The Control Process: Steering and Review in Large Organizations', Scandinavian Political Studies, vol 7, no. 5.

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European Union: Power and Policy-Making
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - Theoretical and Historical Perspectives 1
  • 1 - Policy-Making in the Eu 3
  • 2 - The Development of the European Idea 24
  • Notes 38
  • 3 - Integration Theory and the Study of the European Policy Process 40
  • Notes 55
  • References 56
  • Part 2 - Agenda-Setting and Institutional Processing 59
  • 4 - Agenda-Setting in the European Union 61
  • Notes 74
  • 5 - A Maturing Bureaucracy? 77
  • References 92
  • 6 - From Co-Operation to Co-Decision 96
  • 7 - National Sovereignty Vs Integration? 127
  • Notes 145
  • 8 - The National Co-Ordination of European Policy-Making 148
  • References 165
  • 9 - The Court of Justice and the European Policy Process 170
  • References 183
  • Part 3 - Channels of Representation 185
  • 10 - European Elections and the European Voter 187
  • 11 - The Logic of Organisation Interest Groups 200
  • Note 214
  • 12 - By-Passing the Nation State? Regions and the Eu Policy Process 216
  • Part 4 - A Supranational State? 231
  • 13 - Enlarging the European Union 233
  • Notes 244
  • 14 - The Eu as an International Actor 247
  • 15 - A European Regulatory State? 263
  • References 276
  • 16 - Eroding Eu Policies 278
  • References 293
  • Index 295
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