John Donne: The Critical Heritage - Vol. 2

By A. J. Smith; Catherine Phillips | Go to book overview

138.

Robert Seymour Bridges

1922

Edward Thompson, a friend and neighbour of Robert Bridges, remarked that he knew no one who was so sensitive about human physical suffering. Bridges had trained and worked as a doctor in London hospitals; his comprehension of physical pain influenced his religious views, making him regard ideas of hell as abhorrent human inventions which should be disregarded in the formation of modern religious doctrines incorporating scientific understanding. Bridges referred privately to The Testament of Beauty, the long poem in which he set out his religious beliefs, as 'De Hominum Natura', in tribute to the De rerum natura, Lucretius' sceptical metaphysical picture using the science of his day. In a letter to H.J.C. Grierson, Bridges disparages puns in Shakespeare and Donne in the face of Grierson's attempts to justify them. He took the opportunity to explain why he found Donne himself so uncongenial (The Selected Letters of Robert Bridges, ed. D.E. Stanford, vol. II, 1984, p. 782).

I naturally very much dislike 'humans' who are afraid of Hell. I feel Lucretian on that topic, and I also dislike the Phallic tribe, wherefore I have little sympathy with Donne as a human: and am no doubt severe on him or towards him.


139.

Thomas Stearns Eliot

1923

Eliot returned to ponder Donne's particular interest for modern readers in a review of the Nonesuch Love Poems of John Donne ('John Donne', Nation and Athenaeum, 9 June 1923, pp. 331-2).

-458-

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John Donne: The Critical Heritage - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • General Editor's Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • Note on the Text xiv
  • Introduction xv
  • 1. - Henry Morley 1
  • 3. - William Minto 3
  • 5. - Alice King 15
  • 9. - Edmund Gosse 24
  • 11. - George Edward Bateman Saintsbury 26
  • 13. - Margaret Woods 31
  • 15. - W.F. Collier 50
  • 17. - Gamaliel Bradford 52
  • 21. - Sir Edmund Kerchever Chambers 70
  • 25. - George Edward Bateman Saintsbury 89
  • 29. - Thomas Bird Mosher 102
  • 31. - Augustus Jessopp 105
  • 32. - Anon., Academy 108
  • 35. - Henry Augustin Beers 115
  • 44. - Francis Thompson 180
  • 46. - Anon., Academy 184
  • 48. - Anon., Nation 187
  • 52. - Anon., Quarterly Review 206
  • 59. - Rudolf Richter 221
  • 69. - Charles Eliot Norton 249
  • 73. - Martin Grove Brumbaugh 254
  • 74. - Charles Crawford 255
  • 76. - Herbert John Clifford Grierson 259
  • 79. - Alfred Horatio Upham 272
  • 83. - Janet Spens 295
  • 84. - Phoebe Anne Beale Sheavyn 302
  • 85. - William Macdonald Sinclair 303
  • 89. - Herbert John Clifford Grierson 317
  • 93. - Evelyn Mary Simpson (Née Spearing) 352
  • 94. - Anon., Nation 353
  • 95. - Felix E. Schelling 356
  • 97. - Rupert Brooke 359
  • 100. - Ernest Percival Rhys 370
  • 102. - Sir Sidney Colvin 390
  • 106. - David Macleane 395
  • 107. - Ezra Pound 396
  • 118. - Logan Pearsall Smith 410
  • 126. - Louise Imogen Guiney 432
  • 128. - Herbert John Clifford Grierson 437
  • 132. - Stuart Petre Brodie Mais 451
  • 134. - Elbert Nevius Sebring Thompson 453
  • 137. - William Butler Yeats 457
  • 138. - Robert Seymour Bridges 458
  • Appendix A. 463
  • Appendix B. 467
  • Appendix C: 474
  • Index 475
  • The Critical Heritage Series 502
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