Acknowledgements

Many people helped me in the preparation of this book. I would like particularly to thank the following editors, who talked to me about the way they work: Lewis Blackwell of Creative Review; Iris Burton of IPC's South Bank Group; George Darby, deputy editor of the Telegraph Magazine; Paul Finch of Architects' Journal; Maggie Goodman; and Robin Wood of MillerFreeman. I would also like to thank the following for taking the time to explain to me the rudiments of on-line publishing, here and in the US: Chip Bayers of HotWired; David M. Cole of the Cole Group; Chris Feola of Quill magazine; and Julian Marszalk of PowerPC News. Thanks also to Debbie Beavor for explaining picture editing. Nick Voss Bark of The Last Word talked to me about editorial systems. Razi Mireskandari of Simons, Muirhead & Burton and Nick Braithwaite of Clifford Chance helped me through the new Defamation Bill. Any inaccuracies, omissions and misunderstandings in the book are, of course, my responsibility.

David Longbottom and Joanne Butcher, past and present directors of the Periodicals Training Council, offered valuable encouragement with the project. I should also like to thank Vivien James, formerly of Blueprint, for commissioning the book in the first place, and Rebecca Barden and Vivien Antwi of Routledge for seeing it through to publication.

I also owe a debt of gratitude, not always acknowledged at the time, to those magazine editors for whom I have worked and written over the years: Don Atyeo, Tony Bacon, Paul Colbert, Paul Finch, Simon Garfield, Howard Griffiths, Ian Hislop, Nigel Horne, Richard Ingrams, Sutherland Lyall, Adam Murza, Emma Soames and John Walsh. In their different ways they have all taught me a great deal about what it is to be an editor.

Most of all I would like to thank my wife, Deborah Thorp, for her help, advice and support through the writing of this book-and everything else.

John Morrish
February 1996

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Magazine Editing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Becoming an Editor 4
  • Chapter 2 - The Editor and the Reader 26
  • Chapters 3 - The Editor and the Team 52
  • Chapter 4 - The Editor and Money 84
  • Chapter 5 - Content 1 99
  • Chapter 6 - Content 2 127
  • Chapter 7 - The Editor and the Visual 147
  • Chapter 8 - The Editor and Production 179
  • Chapter 9 - The Editor and Technology 194
  • Chapter 10 - The Editor and the Public 208
  • Chapter 11 - The Magazine Business 228
  • Appendix 1 254
  • Appendix 2 - Press Complaints Commission Code of Practice 256
  • Glossary 260
  • Index 271
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 275

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.