An Historical Study of English: Function, Form, and Change

By Jeremy Smith | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

There remains the pleasant task of acknowledging the kindnesses of those who have helped me, although it should be emphasised that any faults in the book are entirely my own responsibility and the result of my own ignorance, carelessness or stubbornness. Michael Samuels, Emeritus Professor of English Language at Glasgow, has taken a consistent interest in the work's progress since I undertook it. Many, if not all, of the ideas and insights presented here derive from his work, and I am deeply grateful for the generosity with which he has discussed them with me. It is for that reason that I have dedicated the book to him. Gordon Fulton of the University of Victoria, British Columbia, provided crucial initial input from a systemic-functional perspective; I am grateful both to him and to Kathy Kerby-Fulton for their hospitality towards me during my visit to Victoria, during which time I decided to write this book. A special debt is due to Jane Roberts, with whom I also discussed the project at an early stage. Jim Milroy made a number of invaluable suggestions, especially about the structure of Part I, which I have tried hard to take account of; I am extremely grateful for the orientation these comments gave me. I am grateful to Meg Laing and Angus McIntosh, who made valuable and salutary comments on early working drafts, and to other friends with whom I have discussed issues involved in the writing of the book: in particular, I am conscious (even if they are not) of debts to Sylvia Adamson, Richard Beadle, Michael Benskin, Norman Blake, Derek Britton, David Burnley, Michael Clanchy, Richard Cox, Ian Doyle, Tom Duncan, Beat Glauser, José Gómez Soliño, Kate Harris, John Hines, Jonathan Hope, George Jack, Paul Johnston, Michael Lumsden, Catherine Macafee, Derrick McClure, Bella Millett, Celia Millward, Terttu Nevalainen, Ray Page, Malcolm Parkes, Matti Rissanen, Nikolaus Ritt, Wendy Scase, Patrick Stiles, Irma Taavitsainen, Ron Waldron, Keith Williamson and Laura Wright. I also acknowledge and am grateful for comments on various drafts by anonymous readers.

An exploratory paper on issues engaged with in this book was given at a Cambridge seminar in February 1992, and I am grateful to Susan Wright, who was my host on that occasion; other papers in which aspects of this

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Historical Study of English: Function, Form, and Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Plates ix
  • Preface x
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Symbols and Signs, Mainly Phonetic xvi
  • Part I 1
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - On Evidence 13
  • 3 - Linguistic Evolution 39
  • Part II 53
  • 4 - Transmission I: Change in Writing-System 55
  • 5 - Transmission Ii: Sound-Change 79
  • 6 - Change in the Lexicon 112
  • 7 - Grammatical Change 141
  • Part III 163
  • 8 - Two Varieties in Context 165
  • 9 - Conclusion 194
  • Notes 197
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 201
  • References 207
  • Index 216
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 225

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.