An Historical Study of English: Function, Form, and Change

By Jeremy Smith | Go to book overview

References
Agard, J. (1985), '"Stereotype" from Mangoes and Bullets (1985)', in Brown (1992), 147.
Agutter, A. (1989), 'Middle Scots as a literary language', in R.D.S. Jack (ed.), The History of Scottish Literature, Vol. I, Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press, 13-25.
Aitchison, J. (1991), Language Change: Progress or Decay?, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Alleyne, M. (1980), Comparative Afro-American, Ann Arbor: Karoma Press.
Asher, R. and Simpson, J.M.Y. (eds) (1994), The Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, Oxford: Pergamon.
Atkins, J.W.H. (ed.) (1922), The Owl and the Nightingale, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Bailey, C.-J.N. (1973), Variation and Linguistic Theory, Arlington: Center for Applied Linguistics.
Baldinger, K. (1980), Semantic Theory, trans. W.C. Brown and ed. R. Wright, Oxford: Blackwell.
Barber, C.L. (1993), The English Language: an Historical Introduction, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Baugh, A.C. and Cable, T. (1993), A History of the English Language, 4th edn, London: Routledge.
BBC English Dictionary (1992) (J. Sinclair editor-in-chief), London: HarperCollins.
Bean, M. (1983), The Development of Word Order Patterns in Old English, London: Croom Helm.
Bennett, J.A.W. and Smithers, G.V. (eds) (1974), Early Middle English Verse and Prose, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Benskin, M. (1994), 'Descriptions of dialect and areal distributions', in Laing and Williamson (1994), 169-187.
Benskin, M. and Laing, M. (1981), 'Translations and Mischsprachen in Middle English manuscripts' , in Benskin and Samuels (1981), 55-106.
Benskin, M. and Samuels, M.L. (eds) (1981) So meny people longages and tonges: Philological Essays in Scots and Mediaeval English Presented to Angus McIntosh, Edinburgh: Middle English Dialect Project.
Benson, L. (gen. ed.) (1988), The Riverside Chaucer, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Black, M. (forthcoming), 'Studies in the dialect materials of medieval Herefordshire', unpublished Ph.D., University of Glasgow.
Blake, N.F. (ed.) (1992), The Cambridge History of the English Language, Vol. II, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Bloomfield, L. (1933), Language, London: Allen & Unwin.

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An Historical Study of English: Function, Form, and Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Plates ix
  • Preface x
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Symbols and Signs, Mainly Phonetic xvi
  • Part I 1
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - On Evidence 13
  • 3 - Linguistic Evolution 39
  • Part II 53
  • 4 - Transmission I: Change in Writing-System 55
  • 5 - Transmission Ii: Sound-Change 79
  • 6 - Change in the Lexicon 112
  • 7 - Grammatical Change 141
  • Part III 163
  • 8 - Two Varieties in Context 165
  • 9 - Conclusion 194
  • Notes 197
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 201
  • References 207
  • Index 216
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