History, ICT, and Learning in the Secondary School

By Terry Haydn; Christine Counsell | Go to book overview

7

Using ICT to develop historical understanding and skills

Isobel Randall

'Now what I want you to do,' said the teacher to her Year 11 SHP group revising for GCSE, 'is to select any person that made a really important contribution to the development of medicine. We'll have groups of three telling us why their selected person was so important: what his/her impact was; how it was achieved; under what influences; against what obstacles (and how they were overcome); and how lasting his/her influence has been.

'By the start of next lesson you need to have sorted yourselves into groups, selected your person and worked out your strategy. Use your existing knowledge but see if you can find out more. It would be a bonus if you had already begun your extra research. You then have two lessons and your own time to research and organise your presentation - any format - before you present it to us in the following lesson.'


Witnessing good practice

This sounds like one of those sloppy 'Go away and do your own thing' activities that lead to heavy reliance on unthinking copying, time-wasting and lack of clarity and conviction about outcomes. But this is different. Students come to the next lesson with clear plans for action. Their roles in their mixed-ability groups are defined. They set about their work systematically. By the end of the following week they deliver their presentations with confident incisiveness. There is a wide range of the usual formats - role-play, posters or OHTs with commentary, PowerPoint presentations. Everyone has addressed all of the issues; all the presentations are well planned and executed.

Why is this different? In part, because the department's groundwork in this mixed comprehensive school over five years has led the students towards this knowledge of what is expected of them. Teachers have equipped pupils with the required research and presentation skills, while teaching them to work with increasing independence in order to achieve

-176-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
History, ICT, and Learning in the Secondary School
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 269

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.