Foreign Direct Investment in Russia: A Strategy for Industrial Recovery

By Paul Fischer | Go to book overview
4. (4) videotext and package changeover services,
5. (5) fishing in freshwater, along the coast and in the exclusive economic zones, except aquaculture,
6. (6) port administration,
7. (7) supply of fuel and lubricants for ships, aircraft and railway equipment,
8. (8) manufacture and assembly of automotive components (as from 1 January 1999, FDI up to 100 per cent).
Majority participation upon prior approval:
1. (1) port services,
2. (2) naval companies engaged in high-seas traffic,
3. (3) administration of air terminals,
4. (4) private education services,
5. (5) legal services,
6. (6) credit information companies,
7. (7) institutions for categorization of securities,
8. (8) insurance agencies,
9. (9) cellular telephone services,
10. (10) oil and gas well drilling,
11. (11) construction and civil engineering projects.

Notes
1
Educated people continue to move from larger cities to the US—Mexican border towns to seize interesting job opportunities offered for managers, engineers and computer experts by TNCs operating maquiladora plants.
2
Chapter 7.5.4
3
A free-trade agreement between the EU and Mexico was signed in 1999.
4
Chapter 7.5.
5
Moves towards other groupings can be explained by the political aim to reduce dependence on the dominating US economy. See Chapters 7.4.1 and 7.5.2.
6
Chapter 7.5.
7
Russia has also applied for membership but was still considered a 'distant' candidate during a visit of the OECD Secretary-General in early October 1997; The Moscow Times, 9 October 1997.
8
FDI from the US west coast (Washington state and California) could, for example, be similarly intensified to develop raw materials resources (oil, wood, fishing) in Siberia and improve living conditions across the region.
9
It took the country almost seven years to recover from the 1982–83 crisis.
10
Chapter 7.5.4.
11
In this respect, Mexico is in a similar position to Russia; 'Poslednaya fyesta Zediyo' [The last party of President Zedillo], Expert, vol. 24, 29 June 1998, pp. 18–20.
12
Out of total exports of US$110.4 billion in 1997, goods worth US$86 billion were shipped to the United States.
13
Mexico gained its independence from Spain as early as 1821, but it remained the playing ball of colonial powers until 1967 when Austria and France were compelled to leave. Long civil wars and political instability plagued the first independent governments of the country until 1940.
14
Similar to Russia's situation today.

-269-

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Foreign Direct Investment in Russia: A Strategy for Industrial Recovery
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures xiv
  • List of Tables xviii
  • List of Boxes xx
  • List of Maps xxi
  • Foreword xxiii
  • Preface xxv
  • A Word from the Author xxvii
  • List of Acronyms xxix
  • Introduction: Background and Rationale of the Study 1
  • Notes 13
  • Part I - Fdi Theories and Policy Implications 17
  • 1 - Overview of Main Fdi Theories 19
  • Notes 44
  • Part II - Global Fdi Potential and Opportunities for the Russian Economy 47
  • 2 - Determinants of Global Fdi 51
  • Notes 76
  • 3 - Global Fdi Trends 79
  • Notes 114
  • 4 - Tncs as Global Investors 116
  • Notes 130
  • Annex 4.1 the World's Top 100 Tncs Ranked by Foreign Assets, 1996 132
  • Annex 4.2 Top 50 Tncs of Emerging Economies, 1996 138
  • Part III - Fdi as the Catalyst for Industrial Transformation in Selected Large Emerging Markets 143
  • 5 - Fdi Policies and Prospects in China 147
  • Notes 194
  • 6 - Fdi Policies and Prospects in India 197
  • Notes 237
  • 7 - Fdi Policies and Prospects in Mexico 241
  • Notes 269
  • Part IV - Russia's Key Industries and Fdi Achievements in the 1990s 273
  • 8 - Russia's Economic and Industrial Performance During Transition 274
  • Notes 313
  • 9 - Salient Features of Fdi in Russia 315
  • Notes 336
  • Part V - Towards a Long-Term Fdi Strategy for Russia 339
  • 10 - Strategic State Guidance for Fdi 341
  • Notes 354
  • 11 - Russia and Its Competitor Lems 356
  • Notes 375
  • 12 - The Competitiveness of Russian Industry at the Threshold of the Twenty-First Century 377
  • Notes 403
  • 13 - Fdi Sourcing Potential in the World's Leading Economies 405
  • Notes 449
  • 14 - Strategic Target Setting for Russian Fdi During 2000–05 452
  • Notes 461
  • Part VI - Policy Instruments for Enhancing Fdi During 2000–05 463
  • Notes 465
  • 15 - Framework Conditions for Foreign Investors 467
  • Notes 478
  • 16 - Fdi-Related Policy Instruments 481
  • Notes 528
  • 17 - Institution-Building and Fdi Agenda 534
  • Notes 547
  • Appendix: Definitions and Explanatory Notes 549
  • Bibliography and Selected Reading 557
  • Index 565
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