The Politics of Human Rights in Southeast Asia

By Philip J. Eldridge | Go to book overview

Preface and Acknowledgements

Southeast Asia has experienced a period of sustained upheaval since research for this project began in 1995. Assumptions underlying the work and the empirical foundations on which they are based have experienced corresponding turbulence. The human and political as well as economic impact of the regional crisis, beginning in 1997, has been profound. A major regime change in Indonesia and the emergence of East Timor as an independent state have been among the more dramatic developments. Currently, the resignation or impeachment of President Wahid appear highly probable. Intensifying struggles for democratic reform in Malaysia, major constitutional change in Thailand and enlargement of ASEAN membership may prove of equally long term significance to regional human rights development.

This account explores diffuse interactions between democracy, human rights and economic development in Southeast Asian regional and domestic politics, with parallel accounts of ASEAN states' strategies in balancing national sovereignty priorities and pressures to conform with international human rights law, as articulated in United Nations covenants and conventions. The original country focus on Indonesia and Malaysia is reflected in specialised chapters. Together with Singapore, these countries were the most articulate advocates of relativist cum Asian values approaches in regional human rights debates before 1997. These themes have retained their salience, although changing forms since the economic crisis. Subsequently, the work has been expanded to include, though unevenly, all ten ASEAN countries.

Australia combines western history and Asian geography, and is of necessity closely engaged with the region. Comparison of Australia's bilateral relations with ASEAN states indicates a pragmatic approach to integrating human rights policies with regional diplomacy and considerations of national sovereignty, security and economic interest. Accounts of internal debates draw out often overlooked tensions between western-style democracy and universal human rights. As Southeast Asian countries democratise, and therefore societies as well as governments interact more closely, human rights are becoming increasingly part of such engagement. In the short term at least, democratisation in Indonesia and East Timor's secession, coinciding with populist re-directions in Australia's regional policy, have worsened relations at both societal and elite levels.

-viii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Politics of Human Rights in Southeast Asia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 240

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.