Teachers as Researchers: Qualitative Inquiry as a Path to Empowerment

By Joe L. Kincheloe | Go to book overview

Chapter 11

The Foundations of Teacher Research; A Sample Syllabus

The following syllabus might be useful for educators contemplating a course in teacher research or action research. I put it together not only to provide help for such a course but to construct a conceptual overview of ways to approach the study of teachers as researchers. The course takes teachers through a variety of rigorous intellectual experiences that are all formulated to help them construct a rigorous, democratic, just, inclusive, and self-directed professional practice. It puts them in touch with some of the great debates shaping twenty-first-century intellectual life. It assumes that they are capable of the most demanding forms of academic scholarship and that they will be able to develop the capacity to creatively apply the insights derived from such work in their professional practice. A key dimension of the course involves an understanding of the complexities of the social theoretical dimensions of disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity in relation to the subject matter of the humanities, social sciences, and pedagogical analysis. In this context the course engages in the study of the research bricolage and its efforts to create the most compelling approach to research that is currently possible. Because of space limitations this description focuses exclusively on the themes of the course.


COURSE THEMES

Theoretical Grounding of Teacher Research

Analyzing Theoretical Perspectives

On one level this is an interdisciplinary social science, humanities, and pedagogy course that analyzes different theoretical perspectives involving the ways teachers as researchers come to know the world. Participants will be asked to focus these theoretical frames on the educational act. In this context the course will examine the process of theory-building and the theoretical frameworks employed by scholars in the social sciences, the humanities, and pedagogy. As the course attempts to delineate, assess, and

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