Living Wages, Equal Wages: Gender and Labor Market Policies in the United States

By Deborah M. Figart; Ellen Mutari et al. | Go to book overview
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Acknowledgments

In developing a feminist economics or, as we prefer, feminist political economy of wage setting, we began by posing two questions: (1) What can we learn from the range of perspectives in political economy, from classical to marginalist? (2) What additional insights can we offer as feminists? For the latter, we turned to feminist theory outside our own discipline as well as the legacy of feminists working within heterodox political economy.

Colleagues from various disciplines who generously read and commented on one or more of the chapter drafts or work-in-progress presented at professional conferences include Randy Albelda, Nancy Ashton, Heather Boushey, Jan Colijn, Penny Dugan, Robert Drago, Susan Feiner, Mat Forstater, Mary King, Edward O'Boyle, Paulette Olson, Janice Peterson, Steve Pressman, Dawn Saunders, Diana Strassmann, and Myra Strober. We especially appreciate the careful attention to conceptual analysis and detail that legal scholar Elaine Ingulli, economist Ann Jennings, and historian Nancy Robertson gave to the entire manuscript. Of course, we retain responsibility for any errors or omissions. We also had helpful discussions about specific topics with Paula England and Robert Gregg. IAFFE book series editor Jane Humphries and Feminist Economics editor Diana Strassmann championed this project. We received support and assistance from the staff at Routledge (Taylor & Francis), especially economics editor Robert Langham as well as Heidi Bagtazo and Terry Clague.

Our historical research has been aided by assistance from library staff at Richard Stockton College, Sarah Lawrence College, and the Hagley Museum and Library in Wilmington, Delaware. Research was partially funded by a Distinguished Faculty Fellowship from Richard Stockton College, a William Waters grant from the Association for Social Economics, and a Research and Professional Development grant from Richard Stockton College.

We received permission to draw upon and extend parts of our previously published work, and gratefully acknowledge the following:

“Equal Pay for Equal Work: The Role of Job Evaluation in an Evolving Social Norm, Journal of Economic Issues 34 (1): 1-19, by special

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