Advertising and Consumer Citizenship: Gender, Images, and Rights

By Anne M. Cronin | Go to book overview

6

Visual epistemologies and new consumer rights

The preceding chapters have discussed the relation between consumerism, identity and belonging through a focus on the visual in advertising. By outlining the way in which knowledge of the consumer circulates within the advertising industry and within the advertising campaigns it produces, I have argued that visuality and knowledge articulate in powerful and complex ways. Colin Campbell (1997, 1999) has argued that studies of advertising and consumerism should not restrict themselves to a simplistic tracking of meanings in 'messages' about identity. Campbell wants to get away from the idea that consumer acts do not so much do something as say something or communicate something. As I have demonstrated in previous chapters, theories of performativity can be useful for exploring how 'saying something can be doing something'. This 'doing' does not necessarily centre on sending messages, but rather is the very action of constituting the self. Performativity looks at how speech acts produce the subject and aims to show how something as apparently 'immaterial' as speech can form the very materiality of the bodily self. I have adapted this framework to consider the visual and have explored how the origins of meanings and their relation to the awareness of the self produce complex forms of intent and responsibility.

A central theme of my analysis has been the significance and the signification of 'differences', and particularly sexual, 'racial' and cultural differences. As Donna Haraway (1991:249) notes, 'some differences are playful; some are poles of world historical systems of domination. “Epistemology” is about knowing the difference'. Drawing from this insight, I have explored visual epistemologies in advertising and how processes of vision are about seeing the difference. Seeing the difference combines processes of visual perception with frames of knowledge. This fusion creates the social legibility of signs - it produces social meanings linked to images. But seeing the difference also involves seeing through difference: the seeing subject draws on epistemological status in order to authorise itself. In this way, the self becomes authorised as seeing subject. I have argued that the neutral epistemological status of this subject is in fact an enduring myth which hides the sexed, racialised, classed nature of the subject. Focusing on

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Advertising and Consumer Citizenship: Gender, Images, and Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Plates vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Individual, the Citizen and the Consumer 10
  • 2 - Advertising Knowledges 37
  • 3 - Advertising, Texts and Textual Strategies 54
  • 4 - Branding Vision 83
  • 5 - Female Visions 105
  • 6 - Visual Epistemologies and New Consumer Rights 133
  • Concluding Remarks 156
  • Notes 163
  • Bibliography 167
  • Index 175
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 179

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.