Advertising and Consumer Citizenship: Gender, Images, and Rights

By Anne M. Cronin | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1
In fact, the flow of knowledges between academia and the advertising industry is complex and multidirectional (see Lury and Warde 1997).

1

The individual, the citizen and the consumer

1
Cited in Finzi (1992:126).
2
My own translation. All following unattributed translations are my own.
3
In later chapters, I explore these exclusions in terms of 'race', cultural difference and 'Europeanness'.
4
Stolcke uses the term 'fundamentalism' in an ironic way to highlight the extension of this discourse to secular rhetorics and to stress that this should be seen as an extension of Western stereotypical views of Muslim fundamentalism (Stolcke, personal correspondence). I sympathise with Stolcke's intention to disrupt conventional Western views of fundamentalism and with her aim to emphasise that neo-liberal economics are similarly fundamentalist. However, my own analysis points to the complex relation between irony and the re-production of privilege (see Chapters 4 and 6). For this reason, I suggest the term 'cultural essentialism' in the place of Stolcke's concept of 'cultural fundamentalism'. In later chapters I discuss issues of the supposed incommensurability of Islam with Europe.
5
In Britain the 'Rushdie Affair' has highlighted notions of incommensurable 'cultural difference' between Islam and European democratic traditions (Brah 1996).
6
In her later work Fraser (1997) has developed this conceptual structure, yet the principal thrust of her argument remains the same.

2

Advertising knowledges

1
Issues of materiality have been discussed in the context of debates about the direction of cultural studies, in which 'textualising' approaches are often set against 'empirical' work. See Morley (1998) for an overview of these debates.
2
The expression 'visual persuasion' is taken from the title of Messaris (1997). I am not suggesting that his arguments mirror those described above.
3
The terms of meaning, intent and action discussed by Campbell raise some problematic issues around the role of language and the assumed inertia or passivity of the body (see Kirby 1997).
4
Focus groups are small sample groups of consumers who are interviewed in some depth by market researchers in order to gauge opinions and shifts in taste.

-163-

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Advertising and Consumer Citizenship: Gender, Images, and Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Plates vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Individual, the Citizen and the Consumer 10
  • 2 - Advertising Knowledges 37
  • 3 - Advertising, Texts and Textual Strategies 54
  • 4 - Branding Vision 83
  • 5 - Female Visions 105
  • 6 - Visual Epistemologies and New Consumer Rights 133
  • Concluding Remarks 156
  • Notes 163
  • Bibliography 167
  • Index 175
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