Urban Planning and Real Estate Development

By John Ratcliffe; Michael Stubbs et al. | Go to book overview

Notes

1

Urban planning and real estate development: the context

1
Report on the Sanitary Condition of the Labouring Population of Great Britain (1842).
2
Published as Tomorrow: A Peaceful Path to Real Reform and re-issued in 1902 as Garden Cities of To-morrow.
3
Strictly, this was the first planning legislation applied nationally with the very first such legislation dealing with 'town planning' being the Hampstead Garden Suburb Planning Act, passed in 1906.
4
A concept defined further in Chapter 6 'Planning gain and planning obligations'.

2

Policy and implementation of urban planning

1
This date is important in determining what is 'original', so that, when calculating permitted development tolerances, anything built before the appointed day is original and therefore not considered to be an extension.
2
Established in May 2002 and taking responsibility for policy areas from both the former Department for Transport, Local Government and the Regions and the Cabinet Office. A new and separate Department for Transport was also created.
3
A close interaction between transport and land use is guaranteed by the creation of regional transport strategies (linking with Regional Planning Guidance) and Local Transport Plans (linking with Development Plans). For more detail see PPG12: Development Plans (DETR 1999b) Chapter 5, which establishes that… 'the ultimate aim is to ensure that the overall planning and transport strategies are consistent…and integrated with one another'.
4
In Scottish regional councils (Borders, Dumfries, Highlands), all planning functions are implemented at regional level. No district authorities exist in the Island Regional Authorities, so all planning is undertaken by the island councils.
5
Non-elected Regional Chambers were established in eight English Regions in 2000. In 2002 a White Paper was published that reiterated a government commitment to establish elected regional assemblies in England within two or three years.
6
Section 54A of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990. Refer to the section entitled 'The decision-maker's duty'.
7
This legislation has been enacted across England, Wales and Scotland.
8
The panel is appointed by the Secretary of State and consists usually of three independent experts, usually one each from the Planning Inspectorate, the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister and an experienced planning solicitor or barrister. The panel tends to adopt the style of probing discussion of issues rather than a 'forensic' inquiry into the substance of objections raised. For more depth see Sections 31-35C of TCPA 1990 and commentary in Grant (2003).
9
'Shaping the nation', editorial opinion in Estates Gazette, 14 November 1992.

-552-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Urban Planning and Real Estate Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 591

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.