MICHAEL CLARK

Paradoxes from A to Z

London and New York

-iii-

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Paradoxes from A to Z
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Paradoxes from a to Z i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Achilles and the Tortoise 1
  • The Paradox of Analysis 5
  • The Arrow 7
  • Further Reading 8
  • The Barber Shop Paradox (The Paradoxes of Material Implication) 9
  • Berry's Paradox 14
  • Bertrand's Box Paradox 16
  • Bertrand's (Chord) Paradox 18
  • The Paradox of Blackmail 21
  • The Bridge 24
  • Buridan's Ass 26
  • Cantor's Paradox 28
  • Further Reading 35
  • Curry's Paradox 36
  • The Paradox of Democracy 38
  • The Designated Student 40
  • The Paradox of Deterrence 41
  • Further Reading 43
  • The Eclipse Paradox 44
  • Further Reading 46
  • The Paradox of Entailment (Paradoxes of Strict Implication) 47
  • Further Reading 50
  • The Paradox of Fiction 51
  • The Paradox of Foreknowledge 54
  • Further Reading 56
  • Galileo's Paradox 57
  • The Gentle Murder Paradox (The Good Samaritan) 62
  • The Paradox of the Gods 64
  • Grue (Goodman's 'New Riddle of Induction') 66
  • The Heap (The Bald Man, the Sorites, Little-By-Little Arguments) 69
  • Further Reading 76
  • Heraclitus' Paradox 77
  • Heterological (Grelling's Paradox, the Grelling-Nelson Paradox) 80
  • Further Reading 82
  • Hilbert's Hotel 83
  • The Indy Paradox 84
  • The Paradox of Inference 86
  • Further Reading 88
  • The Paradox of Jurisdiction 89
  • Further Reading 91
  • The Paradox of Knowability 92
  • Further Reading 93
  • The Knower 94
  • Further Reading 95
  • The Lawyer (Euathlus) 96
  • Further Reading 98
  • The Liar (Epimenides' Paradox) 99
  • Further Reading 106
  • The Lottery 107
  • Lycan's Paradox 111
  • The Paradox of the Many 112
  • The Monty Hall Paradox 114
  • Moore's Paradox 117
  • Moral Luck 122
  • Newcomb's Problem 125
  • The Paradox of Omniscience 130
  • Further Reading 131
  • Paradox 132
  • Further Reading 135
  • The Placebo Paradox 136
  • The Paradox of Plurality (Extension) 138
  • Further Reading 141
  • The Prediction Paradox 142
  • Further Reading 143
  • The Preface 144
  • The Paradox of Preference 147
  • Further Reading 149
  • Prisoners' Dilemma 150
  • The Paradox of the Question 154
  • Further Reading 156
  • Quinn's Paradox 157
  • The Racecourse (Dichotomy, the Runner) 159
  • The Rakehell 161
  • Further Reading 162
  • The Paradox of the Ravens (Confirmation) 163
  • Further Reading 165
  • Richard's Paradox 166
  • Russell's Paradox 168
  • Further Reading 173
  • The St Petersburg Paradox 174
  • Further Reading 177
  • Self-Deception 178
  • Further Reading 181
  • Self-Fulfilling Belief 182
  • Further Reading 183
  • The Ship of Theseus 184
  • Simpson's Paradox 186
  • Further Reading 189
  • The Sleeping Beauty 190
  • Further Reading 192
  • The Paradox of Soundness 193
  • The Spaceship 194
  • The Toxin Paradox 195
  • Further Reading 196
  • The Paradox of Tragedy (Horror) 197
  • The Tristram Shandy 199
  • The Trojan Fly 200
  • Further Reading 201
  • The Two-Envelope Paradox (The Exchange Paradox) 202
  • The Unexpected Examination (The Surprise Examination, the Hangman) 206
  • The Paradox of Validity (Pseudo-Scotus) 209
  • Wang's Paradox 211
  • The Xenophobic Paradox (The Medical Test) 212
  • Yablo's Paradox 215
  • Further Reading 217
  • Zeno's Paradoxes 218
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