African American Literacies

By Elaine Richardson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

First giving honor to God for making me and giving me the parents and foreparents that I have. This book is dedicated to my momma and daddy, and to my beautiful daughters-Evelyn, Ebony, and Kaila. More love and good spirits. I want to thank my aunt, Hellen Vassel, who cleaned, cooked, washed, and prayed while I wrote the first draft of this manuscript. More fire! I have to thank my daughters again for being my best friends and understanding when momma ain't got time. Thanks also to my niece, Christina, and her father, my brother, Chris. Remember, the world is yours. I would like to thank all of the students with whom I have had the pleasure of working over the years. Don't forget to come back and see me before I get old. Power to the people! Thanks to all of my mentors who helped me with problems and for giving me much needed feedback: Keith Gilyard, Jim Gee, Bernard Bell, Jack Selzer, Cheryl Glenn, John Rickford, John Baugh. Thanks to the reviewers who made this book possible: Angela Rickford, Arthur Spears, and Jim Gee. Thanks to other colleagues in the profession for their work and guidance: Ted Lardner, Tom Fox, Walt Wolfram, Sonja Lanehart, Denise Troutman, Marcy Morgan, Arnetha Ball, Charles Debose, Walter Edwards, H. Samy Alim, Jackie Royster, Shirley Wilson Logan, Gwen Pough, Signithia Fordham, Rashidah Muhammad, Vorris Nunley, the entire NCTE Black Caucus for hush harbor rhetoric. My church-Unity Church of Jesus Christ-for support and for understanding when I'm not able to attend services. Much love to all my colleagues and friends at the University of Minnesota especially Ezra Hyland, Terry Collins, Geoff Sirc, Lisa Albrecht, and all the supporters of The Real Deal on Ebonics Conference, especially Mahmoud El Kati. Most highest big up to my mentor, Geneva da Diva Smitherman. Thanks for helping me to stand on your shoulders. And finally, thanks to two of the best research assistants a sista could have. Thank you Aesha Adams, my sister, daughter, niece, cousin, friend! And, thank you to Adam “da bomb” Banks for your serious critiques and stimulating conversations. I couldn't have done this without you. Many thanks to Christy Kirkpatrick, Louisa Semlyn, and David Barton. Early aspects of this work were supported by grants from the University of Minnesota, Minnesota Humanities Commission, the Pennsylvania State University Minority Faculty Development

-xii-

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