De Facto States: The Quest for Sovereignty

By Tozun Bahcheli; Barry Bartmann et al. | Go to book overview

Conclusion

States in waiting, nations tiring of waiting

Tozun Bahcheli, Barry Bartmann and Henry Srebrnik

The persistence of ethnic separatism in the modern world has long confounded social scientists. A succession of analysts, Karl Marx and Max Weber among them, postulated that ethnicity would dissipate, and ethnic and nationalist conflicts diminish, through the process of modernization. But contrary to their predictions, the integration of ethnic populations into larger state structures and economic systems did not, in most instances, result in a decline in ethnic allegiance; there seems to be little correspondence between modernization and levels of ethnic group cohesion. Instead, the role of ethnicity as a mobilizing force appears to be escalating, and the worldwide development of a sense of ethnic and national consciousness constituted one of the major political and social trends of the twentieth century.

There are as many as 3,500 groups of people around the world who describe themselves in ethnic or national terms, so most of the world's sovereign states are multinational patchwork units of different - often hostile - ethnic communities. On the other hand, there are some 80 multistate national groups - ethnic peoples who live in more than one state. Given this situation, the principle of national self-determination has come into conflict with the doctrine of state sovereignty and the inviolability of borders. Since World War Two, more people have been killed in ethnic conflicts within states than have been killed in wars between states. Today, with ideologically-based superpower rivalry a thing of the past, nationalist doctrines are in the ascendancy, often bringing in their wake intolerance of minorities, hatred of neighbours, and impatience with established frontiers. The past two decades (1980s and 1990s), especially, have seen the intensification of ethnic conflicts, especially in multinational states prone to such antagonisms. Indeed, conflicts between rival nationalities are the basis of most of today's violence and have contributed significantly to global instability. When such hostilities involve national groups in command of sovereign states, they may take the form of territorial invasions and wars. When they affect ethnicities within the same political unit, they can result in communal animosity, separatist agitation and sometimes civil war. The latter has been the case in states such as Russia, Serbia, Georgia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Papua New Guinea, which contain peoples and regions wishing to secede and form their own independent states. 'Ethnic and separatist conflicts are among the most implacable and intense of disputes...and least amenable to a peaceful settlement', notes Alexis Heraclides. He calculates

-245-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
De Facto States: The Quest for Sovereignty
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Political Realities and Legal Anomalies 12
  • 2 - Republika Srpska 32
  • 3 - Montenegro and Serbia 52
  • 4 - Albanian and Serb Rivalry in Kosovo 74
  • 5 - From Frozen Conflict to Frozen Agreement 102
  • 6 - Chechnya 118
  • 7 - The Abkhazians 143
  • 8 - Under Turkey's Wings 164
  • 9 - Palestine 2003 187
  • 10 - Can Clans Form Nations? 210
  • 11 - Bougainville 232
  • Conclusion 245
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.