The Territorial Management of Ethnic Conflict

By John Coakley | Go to book overview

7

Pakistan

Ethnic Diversity and Colonial Legacy

CHARLES H.KENNEDY

At the beginning of 2002, Pakistan faced two monumental threats to its existence. The first was the so-called 'war against terrorism' being waged by the United States and its coalition partners against the remnants of the Taliban and wholly, up to this point, confined to activities within Afghanistan. Pakistan has been obliged to provide support to US and coalition efforts to destroy the Taliban regime. But Pakistan's decision to support the United States has been quite a difficult one for the country's leadership, and it has been far from universally popular-so unpopular that this observer would argue that Pakistan could only pursue such a policy during a period of martial law. In this sense it may be fortunate that General (now President) Parvez Musharraf has ruled Pakistan as a military dictator since October 1999. In effect, Pakistan has been forced into conflict with Pashto-speaking 'Islamists', many of whom were or are residents or citizens of Pakistan. 1 This episode also forced Pakistan to side with the forces of westernization and globalization (never popular in non-western states); that is, the US-Afghan war has forced Pakistan to take a stand which challenges its ethnic loyalties as well as its ideological rationale.

Second, and directly related to the US-Afghan war, has been the resultant deterioration of relations with India over Kashmir. The mid-January 2002 mobilization of troops on both sides of the border and along the Line of Control was the largest and most dangerous since the 1971 Indo-Pakistan war. Unlike 1971, however, when Pakistan suffered military defeat and the dismemberment of its state at the hands of the Indian Army, both India and Pakistan now possess nuclear weapons. The main cause of such unprecedented sabre-rattling is the Indian contention that the 'principles' of the war in Afghanistan-to combat terrorism-should be applied to the Kashmir dispute. That is, Pakistan should suspend any aid to Kashmiri nationalists (read 'terrorists') and should rather seek to weaken their activities within Azad Kashmir. Of course, Pakistan has long

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Territorial Management of Ethnic Conflict
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.