Personal Development in the Information and Library Profession

By Sylvia P. Webb; Diana Greemwood-Jones | Go to book overview

Chapter 4

The interview as a focus for personal development

The interview exists as a mechanism through which formal structured communication concerning a particular problem or requirement can take place, with the objective of resolving that issue. Communication is two-way, with information being given and sought by both parties. It may involve two individuals, an individual and a group, or more than one group. The situations can range from the recruitment of a new employee to the identification of an individual's information needs, as in the library reference or enquiry interview. As such the interview can be viewed as an analogy for many other work situations in which you may be involved, all of which require the use of interpersonal, communication, and organisation skills. So, in that light, why not take the interview as an example, representing the many types of daily interaction you are likely to have, and apply the findings to that wider range of work situations?

Interviews are made up of individuals who assume roles, i.e. that of interviewer or interviewee. These are conducted according to various social rules, depending on the type of interview. However, there are two underlying rules which apply to both roles and in all types of interview. The first relates to preparation. This has already been considered from the job applicant's viewpoint in the previous chapter. Its importance to both interviewee and interviewer will be considered further as each type of interview is discussed.

The second fundamental rule concerns good manners. By the latter I am not referring to the use of 'please' and 'thank you', or shaking hands as you say 'good morning'. The interview is an interaction between individuals with the aim of attaining a solution. The participants need to be able to listen to each other patiently and objectively; exercise tact and discretion; and make decisions based on fact rather than opinion. Sarcastic comment, implied criticism, condescending remarks, or the exhibition of a self-important manner are forms of negative behaviour, and will not result in a successful conclusion of the interview.

How do you set about acquiring the appropriate interpersonal and management skills that will help you in the interview situation, either as a potential employee or as a manager seeking to recruit successfully? The first thing to do is find out about the different types of interview in which

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Personal Development in the Information and Library Profession
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • About the Authors vi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - What is Personal Development? 3
  • Chapter 2 - The Organisation and the Individual 13
  • Chapter 3 - Starting Your Career 25
  • Chapter 4 - The Interview as a Focus for Personal Development 45
  • Chapter 5 - Managing to Develop 59
  • Chapter 6 - Advancing Through Information 81
  • Chapter 7 - On Your Own 99
  • Chapter 8 - Continuing to Develop 121
  • Appendix: Useful Addresses 135
  • Index 147
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 157

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.